SNIPPETS OF HISTORY NEWS: ‘ Today in History October 06 ‘

#AceHistory2ResearchNews – October 06 – Today in History:  

OTHER HISTORY 1866 – 1930’s  

Also in the year 1866, thieves boarded an eastbound Ohio & Mississippi Railroad passenger train near Seymour, Indiana, and entered an Adams Express Company car.

Pointing guns at Adams Express employee Elem Miller, the masked bandits demanded keys to the safes. Miller held keys for the local safe only, so the robbers emptied that safe and tossed the other off the train intending to open it later.

Signalling the engineer to stop the train, the robbers, later identified as the infamous Reno brothers, made an easy get away.

Unaware of what had happened, the engineer sped off into the night while the thieves congratulated themselves on a job well done.

Considered the first train robbery, the incident at Seymour was preceded by a similar train burglary exactly nine months before. In early 1866, bandits entered an Adams Express car en route to Boston from New York and stole over half a million dollars from safes on the unoccupied car.

As in the Seymour case, detectives from the Pinkerton National Detective Agency quickly identified the criminals.

A wave of train robberies followed the Seymour incident. Within weeks, two trains were derailed and their payroll cars robbed. In 1868, an Adams Express car was attacked again at Seymour.

This time the express man was tossed out the door before the safes were cleared of over $40,000.

Train robberies became frequent in the 1870’s and peaked in the 1890’s. Specialists in this form of crime included the Reno brothers, who operated  in southern Indiana; the Farringtons’, whose escapades took them into Kentucky and Tennessee; and the Jesse James gang, who wreaked havoc upon rails in the Midwest. Hired by rail-road companies  anxious to protect themselves, Pinkerton detectives were seldom far behind the robberies.

In the late 1930’s, a Federal Writers’ Project worker recorded a conversation that documents a New Mexico train robbery. “The Early Days in Silver City” provides an eyewitness account of the famous Stein’s Pass robbery of the late 1880’s:

Source: 

#AH2RN2014 

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Snapshot of History: “Joseph Desha US Representative and War Hawk of 1812”

English: Kentucky Governor Joseph Desha

English: Kentucky Governor Joseph Desha (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

#AceHistoryNews says Joseph Desha (1768–1842) was a U.S. Representative and the ninth Governor of Kentucky. After serving in the Northwest Indian War, he moved to Mason County, Kentucky and parlayed his military record into several terms in the state legislature. In 1807, he was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the first of six consecutive terms in the U.S. House. He was a war hawk, supporting the War of 1812, and commanded a division at the Battle of the Thames. Leaving the House in 1818, he lost to John Adair in the 1820 gubernatorial election. In 1824, he made a second campaign for governor based on promises of relief for the state’s debtor class. He was elected by a large majority, and debt relief partisans captured both houses of the General Assembly. When the Kentucky Court of Appeals struck down debt relief legislation he favoured, he lobbied the legislature to replace it with a new court. His reputation was damaged when he issued a pardon for his son, who was accused of murder. He also hastened the resignation of Transylvania University resident Horace Holley, whom he considered too liberal.

Desha retired from public life in 1828.

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