FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: What would become known as – The Bomb | Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

In a 1958 interview, Truman was asked about the soul-searching decision he went through to decide on dropping the bomb. He replied, “Hell no, I made it like _ (snapped his fingers) _ that!” One year later at Columbia University, he said, “The atom bomb was no great decision.” He likened it to a larger gun.

Pres. Harry S. Truman

The components for the 20-kiloton weapon were being shipped to Tinian Island, in the Marianas, aboard the “Indianapolis.” The top-secret package arrived at its destination a mere 24 hours after the official operational order for the bomb was sent to General Carl (“Tooey”) Spaatz.

Prince Konoye, after laboring two years for a route to peace, swallowed poison and died the day before he was to turn himself in as a war criminal.

The bomb, when it arrived, was a metal cylinder approximately 18 inches in diameter and two feet high, but when fully assembled, it measured ten feet long and 28 inches in diameter. It had originally been nicknamed “Thin Man” after the movie and the expected shape, but when it was completed, they changed it to “Little Boy” and gave the small bundle its own hiding place. The secrecy involving the bomb storage area was so secure that a general was required to have a pass to enter.

509th Composite Group, WWII

The other members of the 509th Bomber Group, not included in the mission, knew something was brewing, but they also were unaware of the exact plans. Hence, an anonymous writer was inspired:

Into the air the secret rose,
Where they’re going, nobody knows.
Tomorrow they’ll return again,
But we’ll never know where they’ve been.
Don’t ask about results or such,
Unless you want to get in Dutch.
But take it from one who is sure of the score,
The 509th is winning the war.

The crew of the ‘Enola Gay’ even received a humorous menu as they entered the mess hall for breakfast:

Look! Real eggs (How do you want them?)
Rolled oats (Why?)
Milk (No fishing)
Sausage (We think it’s pork)
Apple butter (Looks like axle grease)
Butter (Yep, it’s out again)
Coffee (Saniflush)
Bread (Someone get a toaster)

509th Composite Group, reunion

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor –

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Farewell Salutes –

Peter Bundy – Edgartown, MA; US Air Force, Vietnam, Captain, C-130 pilot

Michael Clamp – UK / US; US Army

Salvador Finazzo – Brooklyn, NY; US Army, Korea / FL National Guard, Col., Medical Corps

Ray Harris – Nevada, IA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, CBI, B-29 navigator

William Krupicka – Stamford, CT; US Navy, WWII, USS Stephen Potter

Robert LeMaire – Chicago, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO,B-24 navigator/gunner

Mike Mauer – Kansas City, MO; USMC, WWII, PTO / US Army, Korea

Sidney Oxenham – Toronto, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, CBI, 436th Squadron

Joyce Senne – Rochester, NY; US Navy WAVE, WWII, ETO, 1st Lt., nurse

Jack Wattley – Cleveland, OH; US Navy, WWII, USS Moffett and Melvin

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Source: https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2018/10/22/what-would-become-known-as-the-bomb-2/ GP Cox Oct 22

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

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Who was Miss Harrisson? We now know the story of the gardening pioneer denied a scholarship in 1898 for being a woman in a mans world that came to light in a box of archives held by the Royal Horticultural Society #AceHistoryDesk reports

#AceHistoryNews – Oct.16: Miss Harrison had come top in exams on the principles of horticulture – but wasn’t allowed to claim her prize of a scholarship at the RHS because she was a woman: Very little else was known about her, but within hours of the story going out on BBC Breakfast in September, viewers were sending emails and exchanging information on social media: Her family have now come forward with information that fills in the missing gaps in her life: The trail led to the Yorkshire town of Settle, where Olive, by then Mrs Edmundson, spent her final years: Her granddaughter Alison Tyas says her grandmother was a groundbreaker, a heroine – and, for her, a granny who you could rely on for everything.”I think my strongest memory really is as an eight, nine-year-old, being taken for walks in the country and being shown the names of all the flowers,” she says. “She knew all their names.” #AceHistoryDesk reports

Alison Tyas (left) and Fiona Davison (right) looking at old photosAlison Tyas (left) and Fiona Davison (right)

In Alison’s garden, overlooked by the Yorkshire hills, apples hang from neatly cordoned trees, cabbages stand proudly in the vegetable plot and pink sedums nod their heads in the breeze.

It’s clear that her grandmother’s green fingers have passed down the generations

Alison’s memories of her grandmother are of a woman who devoted her life to caring for family. But she never forgot her knowledge of plants. “It was always there, she could always make plants grow.”………………..She says she always knew about her grandmother’s success in the exam. Although Olive was denied her scholarship, she was given a medal, which she cherished all her life……………….Olive was able to train at a college that accepted women – Swanley Horticultural College – and went on to work as a professional gardener.

The medal given to Olive HarrissonThe medal confirms the correct spelling of her surname, which was unclear in the RHS archiveGroup photograph of Swanley female studentsRHS Lindley CollectionsGroup photograph of Swanley female students

Fiona Davison, head of Libraries and Archives at the RHS, visited Settle to meet Olive’s grandchildren and examine family documents……………….She says it is terrific to find out about the real person…………………..”Olive was a gardener all her life, which is really lovely to know and to know that she actually gardened professionally,” Ms Davison says………………..”So despite not getting the scholarship, Olive returned back to Swanley and went on to work for the Cadbury family as a gardener until she got married in 1904 – and then she had a family life…………..Like most women of her time, Olive gave up her career when she married William Edmundson. She devoted her time to looking after her four children and eventually moved to Settle, to be near her daughter, Ruth, and her grandchildren.

Olive Mary HarrissonRHS Lindley CollectionsOlive Mary HarrissonPresentational grey line

Olive Mary Harrisson: An unsung gardening heroine

  • 1898: Enters Swanley College of Horticulture and comes top in the RHS Principle of Horticulture Examination
  • 1899: Takes a second course at Swanley
  • 1901: Employed as a gardener by George Cadbury at Northfield Manor in Birmingham
  • 1904: Marries William Edmundson. Olive gives up her career to look after their four children
  • 1960s: Moves to Settle in Yorkshire to be closer to family

Presentational grey line

In the afternoon, Olive’s granddaughter Alison leads me through the quiet back streets of Settle to see the house where Olive first lived when she moved to the town…………….Even in her final years Olive helped with her daughter’s garden in the grounds of the Quaker Meeting House…………………….She moved into the house in the last few months of her life. The peaceful garden has lawns, flower beds and trees. A few pink crocuses at the base of a tree raise their heads to the autumn sunlight…………………….Olive’s grandson, Chris Harrisson Petrie, who was given her surname as a middle name, joins us there…………….”I suppose it’s her last garden,” he says…………………….He leads me down the steps beside the church to a memorial stone, which bears her name………………………”This is the memorial,” he says. “She died after about four years in Settle. But then she was 92. So a good life, well lived.”

You can see more details of Olive Mary Harrisson’s life in a display at RHS Garden Harlow Carr and RHS Garden Wisley.

https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel/313510
The mysterious Miss HarrissonBBC.Com/ By Helen Briggs Published: October.13:2018:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: CBI – British receive POW’s / Vietnam in the picture By//Pacific Paratrooper

Japanese POWs in Malaya

“From May onwards, prisoners in a terrible state came in daily,” recorded a British gunner unit in Burma, “many of them armed with nothing more dangerous than bamboo spears, trembling with a mixture of malaria and humiliation.”

British soldiers in Burma

But if some proved ready to quit, others did not. To the end, most Japanese who lost their ships at sea deliberately evaded Allied rescuers. On the deck of HMS Saumarez, destroyer Captain Martin Power was directing rescue operations after sinking a Japanese convoy off the Nicobars, when he suddenly heard a “clang” against the ship.

Andaman and Nicobars Islands

Peering over the side, he saw a bald, heavily built Japanese man clinging to a scrambling net with one hand, while hammering the nose of a shell against the hull with the other. Power drew his pistol, leaned over and whacked the man’s head.

“I could not think of anything else to do – I spoke no Japanese. Blood streaming down his face, he looked up at me, the pistol 6 inches from his eyes, the shell in his hand… I do not know how long I hung in this ridiculous position, eyeball to eyeball with a fanatical enemy, but it seemed too long at the time. At last he dropped the shell into the sea, brought up his feet, and pushed off from the ship’s side like an Olympic swimmer, turned on his face and swam away.”

***** ***** *****

By this time of the Pacific War, the Vietnam area of Indochina was in dispute. DeGaulle demanded that the current Vichy government take a firm stand, but this was a disaster. The Japanese had staged a pre-emptive coup against the Saigon administration. Frenchmen became POW’s and their future fate would cause Anglo-American arguments. When US planes arrived from China to carry out evacuations, the French were furious that the aircraft did not bring them cigarettes.

London’s Political Warfare Executive sent a directive to Mountbatten that highlighted the political and cultural complexities of the CBI: “Keep off Russo-Japanese, Russo-Chinese and Sino-Japanese relations except for official statements. Show that a worse fate awaits Japan if her militarists force her to fight on… Continue to avoid the alleged Japanese peace feelers.”

The Dutch, French and British owners of the old Eastern empires were increasingly preoccupied with regaining their lost territories – and they were conscious that they could expect scant help from the Americans to achieve this. The British Embassy in Washington told the Foreign Office:

“If we prosecute the Eastern War with might and main, we shall be told by some people that we are really fighting for our colonial possessions the better to exploit them and that American blood is being shed to no better purpose than to help ourselves and Dutch and French to perpetrate our degenerate colonial Empires; while if we are judged not to have gone all out, that is because we are letting America fight her own war with little aid, after having her pull our chestnuts out of the European fire.”

Quotes taken from “Retribution” by Max Hastings

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor –

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Farewell Salutes –

Edward Bailey – Parma, MI; US Navy, WWII, PTO, 2nd Lt., pilot, KIA

David Cruden – Hurtsville, AUS; RA Air Force # 422443, 460 & 582nd Bomber Command Squadrons

Fred Hermes Jr. – Villas, NJ; US Coast Guard, Academy Grad., Commander (Ret.)

William A. Laux – LaCrosse, WI & Arrow Lakes, CA; US Army, WWII, ETO

John Moore – Baltimore, MD; US Navy, WWII, Captain (Ret.)

Ronald S. Richardson – Gisborne, NZ; RNZ Air Force, WWII, ETO, Lt. Commander, pilot, KIA

Robert Stoner – Buffalo, NY; US Navy, minesweeper

Harry Thomas – Marlington, WV; US Army, WWII

Michael C. Ukaj – Johnstown, NY; USMC, Iraq (the NY limo crash on his 34th birthday)

Elwood Wells – Epsom, NH; US Army Air Corps, WWII, CBI, Captain, 1337 A.F. Base, KIA

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Source: https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2018/10/15/cbi-british-receive-pows-vietnam-in-the-picture/ CBI – British receive POW’s / Vietnam in the picture GP Cox

Oct 15

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

FEATURED BLOGGER: How Phosphorus was Used in the Pacific Theater During World War II By Int’l Historical Research Associates Via Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

Added information. History is not always an easy subject.

In last week’s post, we mentioned the use of white phosphorus bombs by the Japanese: We wanted to take a closer look at this weapon that really gained notoriety during the Vietnam War, what it is and how it was used during World War II. White phosphorus bombs have been in use since World War I. The element phosphorus is highly flammable and toxic, and most notable for spontaneous combustion, meaning it will catch fire if it’s left out in the open. As such, any burning bits of phosphorus are very difficult to fully extinguish. For a visual demonstration of its flammability, take a look at the video below.

The U.S. Army Air Force used white phosphorus a couple of different ways. Because this element reacts when it comes in contact with oxygen, it made an excellent smoke screen for disguising troop movements. Another use was as an incendiary against…

The U.S. Army Air Force used white phosphorus a couple of different ways. Because this element reacts when it comes in contact with oxygen, it made an excellent smoke screen for disguising troop movements. Another use was as an incendiary against enemies, especially those dug out in foxholes or gun emplacements. On contact with human skin, white phosphorus has been known to burn all the way to the bone. Fifth Air Force created something that became known as “Kenney’s Cocktails,” 100-pound bombs with their main explosive charge replaced with phosphorus. Dramatic images of these “cocktails” in use can be seen in photos from the November 2, 1943 raid on Rabaul.

White phosphorus bombs were also used as air-to-air bombs by the Japanese against Allied air raids, but these were far less effective than ordinary flak bursts. Some of the more famous photos of exploding phosphorus bombs are from 1944 and 1945. Thanks to someone shooting a video of these explosions, we can show you several examples of phosphorus bomb bursts as seen from the air

As we were digging up videos for this post, we found a video from 1943 of a test to see if phosphorus or standard explosives created more casualties in the field. Watch that video here. At the time, incendiary weapons were a regular part of warfare, but excessive civilian casualties due to fire-bombing during and after World War II led to a ban on any incendiary device used in any region near civilians (cities, for example) in 1980. Despite this, white phosphorus is still used to this day, primarily to create smokescreens. Whether or not the chemical should be banned altogether is still a matter of international debate.
Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

#AceNostalgiaNews The Southern Titanic: That’s what the German flagged Monte Cervantes came to be known as, after sinking in 1930 at the time the luxury liner was only three years old built in Hamburg it steamed back and forth from Argentina sailing the South America’s #AceHistoryDesk reports

#AceHistoryNews – Sept.30: The luxury liner was only three years old at the time, a beautiful steamed built in Hamburg, and sailed the South American routes from Buenos Aires to Puerto Madryn, Punta Arenas, Ushuaia, and back to capital city of Argentina again: It was during this cruise in the first month of 1930 that Captain Theodor Dreyer ran into trouble, first with a storm that arrived on January 22 and caused the Captain to look for shelter in nearby Yendegaia Bay #AceHistoryDesk reports

https://t.me/HistoricalPics/9308: They entered the Beagle Channel, skirting between the Argentina coast and a series of Chilean islands, the water ahead was full of seaweed and posed significant troubles for the ship’s lookouts to spot trouble: Carefully observing the known obstacles shown on their charts, the ship eased ahead until a submerged rock was spotted and they veered successfully to miss it. Soon things would change dramatically, as they cruised straight into a rock not shown on their charts, and the hull ripped open while tilting to port as her momentum carried the ship up onto the rocks.

Passengers were flung about on the decks and in their rooms, anything loose fell and broke, water poured in while the crew worked to secure watertight doors and control the flooding:The crew did a fine job, getting all of the 1117 passengers and 255 of her crew into lifeboats. Soon launches from the nearby sea towns who heard the Monte Cervantes SOS began to arrive, one was from a nearby prison and housed dozens of the passengers in the cells until transportation arrived.

There were 70 crewman who remained aboard for the next three days, they worked to repair things and restart the engines, eventually bringing the ship off the rocks: Yet on January 23 her bow began to sink, the survivors knew that this was the end and started to jump to safety in the cold salty sea.

All but one would make it, Captain Dreyer slipped as he tried to jump, and plummeted instead into an opening in the ship’s promenade: The Monte Cervantes came to rest with her stern out of the water, but not in the shopping lane, so she was left to rust. #shipwrecksaturday #AceHistoryNews

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

FEATURED BLOGGER: The Generals, Australians and Borneo (1) // Pacific Paratrooper

I joined Gen. MacArthur on board the USS Boise at Palawan on 8 June as I had promised. The ship steamed south and the next afternoon joined the main convoy carrying the 9th Australian Division, commanded by Gen. Wooten. We made the rendezvous between Palawan Island North Borneo.

USS Boise

From: General Kenney Reports

The weather was perfect, the mountains on either side of the straits were beautiful, I had about 9 hour’s sleep the night before and there was no sign of a Jap airplane in the skies. It was so peaceful, it didn’t seem as though there was a war on at all.

On the morning of the 10th, 6 o’clock a lone Jap bomber came over, dropped one bomb, which missed a landing craft, and then flew away under under a hail of antiaircraft fire.

We watched the Naval gunfire on the landing beach on the island of Labuan, our first objective, and after the RAAF and the 13th Air Force bombers got through a farewell blasting of the Jap positions, Generals MacArthur and Morehead, Adm. Royal and Naval commander, Bostock, and myself went ashore.

The Aussie first-wave troops had landed and pushed inland from the beach about ¼ mile. They put out their patrols and then calmly started cooking their tea. Nothing seemed to worry this fine-looking body of troops. They were bronzed and healthy-looking, well equipped and there was no question about their morale.

Australian soldiers land at Labuan Island, North Borneo

The “brass-hat” party moved along the road paralleling the beach, to the accompaniment of an occasional sniper’s shot and a burst of machine-gun fire ahead of us and farther inland. I began to feel all over again as I had at the Leyte landing, Mac kept walking along, enjoying himself hugely, chatting with a patrol along the road every once in a while and asking the men what they were shooting at.

Moreshead and Bostock asked me where we were going, I shrugged my shoulders and pointed at MacArthur. Just then a tank came lumbering along the road and we stood a side to let it pass. As the tank reached the top of a little rise perhaps 50 yards ahead of us a burst of rifle and machine-gun fire broke out and then stopped. The turret gunner looked out, said, “We got those two obscene, unmentionables so-and-so’s,” and the tank drove on.

Australian troops and tanks land at Labuan Island

Mac commented on the good clothes and well-kept equipment the two dead Japs had and remarked that they looked like first-class troops. Just the, an Australian Army photographer came along to take pictures of the two dead lying there in the ditch. His bulb flashed and he dropped to the ground with a sniper’s bullet in his shoulder.

I walked over to Gen. MacArthur and told him that all he had to do was to hang around that place long enough and he would collect one of those bullets too and spoil our whole trip. It looked to me as though we had finally gotten into the Jap outpost position and if he wanted my vote, it was to allow the Australian infantry to do the job they came ashore for.

To be continued….

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Military Humor –

When the military has cut-backs….

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Farewell Salutes –

Eliza Blanchard – Lincoln, AL; US Army WAC, medic

Richard Devos – Grand Rapids, MI; US Army Air Corps, WWII

Jane (Sepko) Frink – Southington, CT; US Army

Dennis Hogg – Sydney, AUS; RA Air Force # 1200664, Vietnam, A Squadron

Gordon Lewis – Thornlands, AUS; Australian Army # 434815, WWII

Patrick McCormick – Toronto, CAN; Canadian Army, WWII

Ronald W. Nutt – Ocean Grove, AUS; RA Air Force # 135995

Graham Rohrsheim – Port Pirie, AUS; RA Navy, Commander (Ret.)

Alfred Tuthill – Chesapeake, VA; US Coast Guard, Master Chief Radioman (Ret. 28 y.)

William Zobel Jr. – Hollywood, FL; US Air Force

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Related

Gen. Kenney on the End of 1944In “First-hand Accounts”

February 1944 (3)In “WWII”

February 1944 (3)In “WWII”

Source: GP Cox

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

FEATURED WRITER: CBI Theater – May 1945 | By Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryNews reports

B-24 Liberator, “Black Magic”, 7th Bomb Group

CBI Theater – May 1945

GP Cox

Jul 9

Outstanding mission of the period was a record bridge-busting jaunt by B-24’s of the Seventh Bomb Group, which destroyed or damaged 37 rail and road spans on the Burma-Siam railroad east of Thanbyuzayat. The Japs have been using rail cars with special auxiliary wheels which can leave the bombed-out trackbed and use the highways, and pilots reported seeing several of these, some of them directing machine gun fire at the attackers.

B-29, WWII

HEADQUARTERS, XX BOMBER COMMAND, INDIA(UP) – Administering treatment prescribed by a medical officer by radio at this headquarters, two crew members of a B-29 returning from a raid on Japanese-occupied Burma saved the life of a third member of the crew.
When the crew member was seriously wounded by shell fire over the target, Sgt. Patsy J. Grimaldi of Brooklyn, radioed the following message to his base:
“Wounded man on board. Shot in neck. Can’t move right arm. Think collar bone broken. Advise if possible.” The radioed pulse and respiration reports continued every ten minutes during the ship’s return trip. An ambulance met the plane at the airstrip and the injured airman was rushed to a hospital where he is now recovering.
Sgt. Grimaldi, who is a member of the Billy Mitchell Group, Twentieth Bomber Command, sent back the messages as well as rendering first aid. A tactical mission report said he “is to be commended on the manner in which he discharged his duties under a trying situation.”

A XX BOMBER BASE, INDIA – The navigator who called calmly over the interphone to ask for certain information received as an answer, “Hell, I couldn’t piece these maps together if I wanted to.”
The answer came from Lt. Harold Vicory of Greenleaf, Kans., 23-year-old radio officer aboard a B-29 Super-Fortress who fortunately was not working with his legs crossed during a mission over Jap-occupied Singapore.
“Enemy fir was very thick,” said Vicory. “The Japs were really peppering us. I was at my desk with a packet of maps and charts when gunfire pierced the belly of the plane, zipped right between my legs, up through the top of the desk, through the maps, and shot out the top of the plane. It all happened pretty fast.”
After he had collected his wits, Vicory examined his maps to discover that the Malay Peninsula had disappeared in thin air.
“They wiped themselves off the map and didn’t know it,” he exclaimed. “And just about that time, the navigator called back and wanted me to give him some information.”

WACs in the CBI

WACS IN THE CBI

The War Department announced this week that 15,546 WAC’s of the Corps’ total strength of 94,000 are serving overseas, including 334 in India and Ceylon.
Other distribution includes, European Theater – 7,030; Southwest Pacific, including Australia, New Guinea, Dutch East Indies and Philippines – 5,255; Italy – 1,612; Guam and Hawaii – 206; Africa and Egypt – 596; Alaska – 103; and Bermuda, Labrador and British Columbia – 394.

Here are two Americans rescued by the 14th Army near Pegu after having been POWs in the hands of the Japanese. At left, Lt. Allan D. DuBose, of San Antonio, Tex., finds it’s the same old Army as he “smilingly” absorbs a shot from Sgt. Orlando Roberto of the 142nd General Hospital in Calcutta. After 18 months as a prisoner in Rangoon, DuBose finds that times change, but not the Army. And at right, Maj. Wesley Werner of St. Louis, happily quaffs his first bottle of beer at the same hospital in Calcutta. Werner had been a prisoner of the Nips since November 17, 1942. A former pilot with the old Seventh Bomb Group he is remembered by old timers in the Theater as the skipper of the noted B-24 Rangoon Rambler. Werner was one of the best known airmen in the 10th Air Force.

CALCUTTA – Happiest group of American soldiers in the India-Burma Theater this week were 73 prisoners of war liberated by the British 14th Army near Pegu on their drive to Rangoon.
The first group of recaptured American prisoners, mostly Air Corps personnel, was recuperating in 142nd General Hospital in Calcutta – with American beer, cigarettes, good food, candy bars, fruit juice, newspapers, magazines and everything possible that Army authorities and Red Cross would provide comfort.

Behind them was a grim memory of starvation, filth, disease and indignities administered by the Japanese to the “special treatment” group composed of flyers captured after the bombing of the Japanese homeland began.

The rescued men will also never forget the forced march out of their prison stronghold in Rangoon to north of Pegu where their Japanese guards deserted in the face of bullets and sound of artillery of the advancing 14th Army.
Two airmen, Lt. Kenneth F. Horner, New Orleans, and Pfc. Smith W. Radcliff, Dexter, Kans., had been prisoners for nearly 35 months; many others had sweated out their return since the fall of ’43 and only two of the recaptured prisoners had been missing since this year.

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Military Humor – C.B.I. style –

“IS THERE REALLY A COSTUME PARTY AT THE RED CROSS TONIGHT?!”

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Farewell Salutes –

George Bezecny – brn: CZECH; British information Service & US Army Intelligence Div. / USMC

Donald Gillis – Cancouver, CAN; RC Navy, WWII

William Hare Jr. – Sylacauga, AL; US Army, WWII, ETO

Ray Jones – Chesterfield, MO; US Air Force, Sgt.

Eleanor Kruger – Pottsville, PA; civilian, War Department, decoder

Arthur Mulroy – Brooklyn, NY; US Navy, Korea & Cuban Missile Crisis, USS Antietam

John Peter Jr. – Swansea, IL; US Army, 11th Airborne Division, medic

Gary Riggins – Sawyer, KS; US Army, WWII, Engineer Corps

Michael Sklarsky – Bristol, FL; US Air Force (25 y.)

Homer Waybright – Fayetteville, NC; US Army, WWII, Korea & Vietnam, Sgt. Major (Ret.)

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Related

September 1944 (3) – CBI RoundupIn “WWII”

CBI NewsIn “WWII”

April 1943 (1)In “WWII”

https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2018/07/09/cbi-theater-may-1945/

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring