FEATURED: #InternationalWomensDay WM Police Celebrating women police officers of the past who blazed a trail from 1917 onward to this day #AceHistoryDesk reports

We wanted to take this opportunity to reflect on our past, to look at the remarkable women who came before us and to honour them for forging the way to improving gender equality in our workplace.

Celebrating our trailblazers for International Women’s Day

It’s International Women’s Day (8 March) and this year’s theme is gender equality.

wmp

These are some of the trailblazers from WMP’s past.

Our first female police officer

Evelyn Miles

wmpEvelyn Miles, one of the force’s first female officers

She was recruited in 1916 as a lock-up matron and in 1917 became the first woman constable along with Rebecca Lipscombe. They were aged 54 and 61 respectively.

Their duties involved dealing with vulnerable young females. However, they weren’t allowed to arrest anyone.

By 1935 there were a total of 17 women officers but there were strict rules. Up until 1931 Birmingham only recruited married women past child bearing age. It was only with the new regulations in 1931 that policewomen were allowed to be unmarried.

Evelyn was promoted in 1918 as the small force of police women began to grow and she retired at the age of 77.

Our first female police sergeant:

Ena Goodacre

wmpEna Goodacre, first female sergeant

Ena was born in 1911 and spent her early years on her family’s farm. After joining Coventry City Police in 1938, she became the force’s first female sergeant in December 1943.

Our first female inspector:

Florence Mildred White

wmpFlorence White, first female inspector.
Pictured back row fourth from the left

Florence became a police officer for Salisbury Town Council in March 1918.

She wanted to widen her experience and with the full approval of Salisbury Police she transferred to Birmingham City Police in June 1925 as a female enquiry officer, equivalent in rank to a sergeant.

She recruited two assistants and in 1930 was promoted to inspector, becoming the first female inspector in the country.

Our first female firearms officer

Ashley Moore

wmpPC Ashley Moore

Although Ashley wasn’t the first female armed officer in West Midlands Police, she was the first woman to be posted to an armed response vehicle (ARV) after joining the Firearms Operations Unit (FOU). The few that preceded her were based at Birmingham Airport.

In April 2000 Ashley was posted to the ARV team. The department initially struggled to know how to accommodate her. To get to the crew room you had to walk through the locker room which of course was full of male officers’ lockers. The unit literally cleared out a cleaning cupboard and put her locker in there.

Our first female BAME officer:

Pauline Campbell-Moss

wmpPauline Campbell-Moss

Pauline made history when she joined West Midlands Police as the first BAME officer in 1974.

She left after three years to work with social services in Birmingham. By 2017 she was living in New York and working in a prison ministry.

Our first female ACC:

Pat Barnett

wmpPat Barnett, first female ACC

Pat Barnett was the very first female officer to hold the rank of Assistant Chief Constable (ACC) in the West Midlands in August 1991.

She joined Birmingham City Police in 1966. She then transferred to Warwickshire & Coventry Constabulary for four years until Coventry was amalgamated into West Midlands Police.

In 2020, around 51 per cent of our workforce is women, and 32 per cent officers. Since PC recruitment reopened last year, around 52 per cent of applications for police constable are from women.

We are seeing more and more women coming through the ranks and working in what were once thought of as male dominated roles including firearms, CMPG, traffic and the dog unit.

If you’re on social media search #eachforequal #IWD20 #WMPfamily for more stories on International Women’s Day.

#AceHistoryDesk report …………..Published: Mar.08: 2020:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided at https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

Featured Blogger Report: The Last Living Paratrooper from MacArthur’s return ….. // Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

Gen. Douglas MacArthur (l.) and Richard “Dick” Adams (r.)

Richard Adams describes General MacArthur as “quite a guy.”

In commemoration of the 75th year of World War II in the Philippines, one of its heroes returned. Richard “Dick” Adams visited Corregidor once again, but this time, he did not parachute out of a C-47 plane to land on the towering trees of the Rock. The 98-year-old understandably opted to ride a ferry.

He was recently, poignantly, at the MacArthur Suite of the Manila Hotel, in a room dedicated to Gen. Douglas MacArthur, who led the American and Filipino troops in liberating the country from Japanese occupation. MacArthur actually stayed in that suite for six years, as Manila Hotel’s honorary general manager.

It was a time of fear across the country as Japanese forces ravaged Manila and the countryside. People clung to MacArthur’s words, “I shall return,” which he said after he was forced to abandon the Philippine island fortress of Corregidor under orders from U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt in March 1942. Left behind at Corregidor and the Bataan Peninsula were 90,000 American and Filipino soldiers, who, lacking food, supplies, and support, would soon succumb to the Japanese offensive.

‘Dick’ Adams

It was at this battered battleground that Adams, as a young paratrooper assigned to the HQ Company 3rd Bn in an 81 mm mortar platoon, arrived on February 16, 1945. He is the last surviving paratrooper of the group and he shares his memories of the wartime experience.

What he remembers the most about his Corregidor landing is the wind. “It was a beautiful day when we came in at about a thousand feet above the water and then the island came up 500 feet so we jumped in about four to five hundred feet,” he says. “And the wind was a little too hard so they dropped it down and once they came after us we were pretty close to the ground.”

The landing itself was over pretty quickly, but the wind blew him toward a cliff and not the golf course that he was aiming for. Luckily, he says, he landed on a tree and that kept him from going down further.

He thinks something else saved him that day. “I wear a Miraculous Medal that my mother gave me. The second day after my jump, I noticed that the medal was gone, it was torn off,” he says. “About a week after we went to Corregidor, we went up to the hill and there were so many flies. You couldn’t open a can and put it in your mouth. The flies were terrible because the battlefield was kind of a mess that encourages the flies. I went back down to the jump field to get a parachute to protect me from the flies and came back towards the hill. Of my hands and when I picked it up, I saw it. There was my medal, in the middle of the field. So that was kind of a Miraculous Medal.”

PT-32, one of 4 boats used in the escape.

Adams spent a good part of the first day getting injured troopers to the first aid station. He was in Corregidor until early March, when General MacArthur returned. He was part of the border patrol, spending most of his time on the hills and further down, he recalls.

Although a young recruit at the time, having joined the troops only a few months prior to his assignment, he understood the significance of that tiny island. “It was kind of a guard in Manila Bay. It has a kind of control on any ship that came in through there. It was mainly a field with a fortress where they control it,” he shares. “Also, it was the last place where the phrase ‘I shall return’ became significant because that’s where General MacArthur left from going to Australia and then he came back. It was important in a sense that it controls the Manila Bay, but it is also significant just because it was the last place that the Americans surrendered from.”

“It was a pretty scary place,” he says of wartime Philippines. “I joined a few months earlier, so I was kind of new in the game at that time. We were in Mindoro and I ended up in the hospital. After Corregidor, we ran in Negros, so we got around a little bit. We spent most of our time up in the woods.”

He has vivid memories of MacArthur. “We did meet once in a while. I was at the dock when he came in and, as a matter of fact, the first time I was back in Corregidor I was in the museum and I found a picture of myself that was standing on the dock where he and I met. So, I welcomed him, but I don’t think he knows. He was quite a guy.”

After the Negros campaign and occupation duty in Japan, Adams returned home and joined the National Guard as operations sergeant in the 165th Infantry and left 20 years after as a master sergeant. He obtained a law degree from St. John University and is retired from General Motors. He has two daughters, one of whom is an Air Force Captain.

Pictures are courtesy of Manila Hotel

Click to view slideshow.

His first trip back to Corregidor was in 2012 and he described it as an emotional trip. “I like going back to Corregidor. It’s really an honor to be here. It’s a little embarrassing when there are people standing around taking pictures—the people you should be taking pictures of, they are not here. Some might be still in Corregidor. My whole climb to fame is that I was there and I’m still here,” he says.

Of his visit, he shares, “I’m doing these to honor those people, the Filipinos and Americans that defended the island and also those who on the 16th came back to Corregidor. I think we are honoring those not only who came back on the 16th but everyone who was left.”

By : esqiremag.com | Feb 18, 2020

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE.

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Military Humor –

“Yes, sailor, we docked 2 days ago!”

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Farewell Salutes –

Margaret Adamchak – Bridgeport, CT; Civilian, WWII, Naval Dept. employee

John Dennis – Tucson, AZ; US Navy, WWII, radar, USS Rochambeau

Paul H. Gebser – San Diego, CA; US Navy, WWII, Machinist’s Mate 1st Class, USS Oklahoma, KIA (Pearl Harbor)

John Henry – Lugarno, AUS; RA Air Force, WWII, pilot instructor

Benjamin Meo – Haddon Heights, NJ; USMC, WWII

Carl Overcash – Rowan County, NC; US Army, WWII, PTO

Augustin Polasek – MI; US Army Air Corps, WWII, bomber pilot, Colonel (Ret.)

Andrew Schmitz – Richmond, VA; US Navy, WWII, fireman 1st Class, USS Oklahoma, KIA (Pearl Harbor)

Donald Stratton – Red Cloud, NE; US Navy, WWII, PTO, USS Arizona survivor / USS Stack / author, “All the Gallant Men”

Charles Wion – La Junta, CO; US Navy, WWII, Signalman

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Source: // Pacific Paratrooper

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided at https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

Snippets of History: 55 Years After “Bloody Sunday,” Fight to Vote Marches On in Selma Alabama

From VOA News: “55 Years After ‘Bloody Sunday,’ Fight to Vote Marches On in Selma By Kane Farabaugh March 02, 2020 09:43 PM SELMA, ALABAMA – On March 7, 1965, hundreds of voting rights demonstrators at the same location in Selma fell victim to tear gas and brutal beatings as Alabama law enforcement officers descended on the peaceful civil rights march.

55 Years After “Bloody Sunday,” Fight to Vote Marches On in Selma Alabama

Snippets of History: What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “For SALE at William Neilson’s Store.” March 2

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “For SALE at William Neilson’s Store.” In addition to advertising his wares…

In addition to advertising his wares in the New-York Gazette and Weekly Mercury, the New-York Gazette or Weekly Post-Boy, and the New-York Journal, William Neilson also inserted a notice in the Connecticut Journal and New-Haven Post-Boy.  Yesterday I examined the iteration of the advertisement that appeared in the March 1, 1770, edition of the New-York Journal, focusing on the nota bene about his prices remaining the same as before the nonimportation agreement went into effect.  The version that ran in the Connecticut Journal listed many of the same goods, but did not deploy copy identical to the advertisement in the New-York Journal.  Most significantly, it did not include the nota bene about prices.  Why not?

March 2

Snippets Of History: Slavery Advertisements Published March 2, 1770

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution:

The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

Slavery Advertisements Published March 2, 1770

Featured Blogger: Restoring WWII with accuracy // Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

TSF BP 382P HQ
Jeep of the Military Police, Theater Service Forces with complete unit markings. This photograph is most likely a post-war photograph taken during occupation duty.

I’ve created this post to help out a reader now restoring an authentic WWII 1942 Ford GPW. I needed help myself – Matt Underwood, past Editor of “The Voice of the Angels” newspaper of the 11th Airborne Division Association – and I’m proud to say – my friend, came to my rescue.

The only drawback to the Army Manual was that Airborne Divisions had not really developed at the time the text of this book was written, and therefore, the examples of actual vehicle markings on jeeps, etc., of Airborne Divisions are not among the samples/examples in the manual itself. Armies, Corps, and Infantry Divisions, Armored Divisions, and Cavalry Divisions are covered, and all smaller units, but no Airborne Divisions. Everything else about Airborne jeeps are the same as the rest of the Army, with the exception of distinguishing between, say, the 11th Armored Division and 11th Airborne Division. Other than being in two different theaters of war, they are almost the same.

The world of military vehicles, especially American WWII stuff, is a growing field, as old junkers are discovered in barns, landfills, junkyards, and out in the woods, and collectors are buying them and restoring them. When they get their special treasure all completed, they want total accuracy in these unique unit markings to add the final tough of authenticity. So the number of websites featuring vehicle markings has grown rapidly over the past 10 years.

28-103E HQ-4
A jeep from the 103rd Engineer Combat Battalion, 28th Infantry Division photographed on a bridge somewhere in Europe. The unit bumper markings are applied according to regulations and designate the 4th vehicle of the Headquarters of 103rd Engineers, 28th Infantry Division. The windshield carries the addition marking “T4 Cole” in white.

http://www.classicjeeps.co.uk/american-vehicle-markings/

https://blog.kaiserwillys.com/military-jeep-markings

http://www.lonesentry.com/panzer/jeep-markings.html

http://jeepdraw.com/

https://g503.com/

http://www.kingtigerebooks.co.uk/p/world-war-ii.html

Now back to the last part of the problem. The 11th Airborne Division, like other Airborne Divisions from 1942 to 1944, followed the Army’s Table of Organization & Equipment No. 71, dated 17 Feb 1942. The A/B units in Europe and the States updated this TO&E in Dec 44, but not the 11th or 503rd…not till the early summer of ’45. So almost all of the time the 11th was in combat, it had the same set-up for everything that it always had—at least on paper. I do have a substitute source for part of the data, however, and here’s what I believe your reader will need to know.

11th A/B Div. repairs a truck in Japan

I think that for most of the War, MOST of the 11th Airborne’s jeeps and trucks bore vehicle markings like your sepia-colored photo of the jeep from the 188th. Its bumper markings are important in solving this puzzle:

11AB..188-I…………SV8 = 11th Airborne, 188th Infantry, Service Company, 8th Vehicle

No one unit in a WWII airborne division would have such a high number of jeeps unless they were all numbered in a regiment-wide motor pool.

I have some proof that the 511th—being a Parachute Infantry Regiment—had probably all of its vehicles marked for its Service Company, as the motor pool for the whole regiment, which had 3 Parachute Inf. Battalions. It is probable that the 187th and 188th, being Glider Infantry Regiments with only 2 Glider Inf. Battalions each, probably also had all its vehicles marked for its respective Service Cos., which had charge of the motor pool for the whole regiment.

The vehicle allowance for the motor pool of the 511th PIR, seems to TOTAL out as follows: (1) Sedan; (2) Ambulances; (13) 1/4-ton Trucks (which are what Jeeps were usually referred to in official tables); (15) 3/4-ton Trucks; (16) 2-1/2 ton Trucks; and (14) 1-ton Trailers. These totals are for the whole Regiment, but are internally divided between the Service Company’s “HQ Co. Squad”, its “1st Bn. Squad” and 2nd & 3rd Bn. Squads as well, and its own “Transportation Platoon”—-which would be maybe what we would think of as a vehicle “reserve”, or were the vehicles under current repair. It probably allowed a flexibility that couldn’t be had otherwise. What this tells me is that when Col. Haugen needed his staff car, his adjutant called the “motor pool” (the Service Company’s Transportation Platoon) and said “Bring around the Colonel’s staff car.” Then the Colonel’s driver, a NCO from the Transportation Platoon’s “HQ Co. Squad” pulled his staff car up to the Colonel’s CP (command post) and waited. Same with the Colonel’s jeep, etc. When Lt.Col. John Strong, CO of 3rd Bn., needed his jeep, he or his adjutant called up the motor pool and ordered his jeep—-then a driver from the Transp. Platoon’s “3rd Bn. Squad” brought his jeep to Lt.Col. Strong’s CP and waited. When I say “his jeep” it was likely the same one every time, but could be a substitute on any given occasion if the main jeep was getting repaired or cleaned, etc. The pooling of all vehicles into the Service Company may have simply been the best idea to allow flexibility whenever a vehicle was needed on short notice.

From late 1940 to February 1945, markings were to be made in blue-drab. This type of color scheme would prevent enemy intelligence from gathering and identifying military markings as the two colors were hard to distinguish from one another when viewed in black and white photographs. The official color of these markings was changed to flat white in February 1945, but the reserves of blue-drab paint were used until exhausted.

In other words, ALL the jeeps and other vehicles would have Service Co. marks on the bumpers, regardless of who in the Regiment was using them. Therefore, the 511th would have a fleet of jeeps marked SV1 through SV13. I am GUESSING (for now) that the 187th and 188th had similar systems, which would explain your photo of a 188th jeep marked SV8. I am guessing that if the system holds, the 188th was only allotted 9 jeeps total.

Anyway, I will get back to you on that.

As to 11th Division HQ, I’m not sure yet as to its markings. Probably they had their own vehicles, but unsure as yet. If so, Gen. Swing’s jeep would probably have been bumper marked like this:

11ABX………………..HQ1 = 11th Airborne Division, HQ Company, 1st Vehicle

As always, these are 3″ tall letters, and the center of the bumper may or may not have a star painted on—it is the US star for all vehicles, found all over most other big surfaces. The bumpers often had them to start with, and as paint wore off and was repainted, sometimes the bumper stars were skipped, leading to the frequent blank space in the center where a star once was.

MATTHEW UNDERWOOD

Bookbinder/Conservator, Boyce Centennial Library,

The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary;

Editor Emeritus, Voice of the Angels,

11th Airborne Division Association

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The 11th Airborne uniform examples

Click to view slideshow.

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Click on images to enlarge.

Military Humor –

Uuh… guys…?

11th A/B Div. repairs a truck in Japan

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Farewell Salutes –

Dominic “Mickey” Bria – Smithers, SC; US Army, Korea, 187th RCT ‘Rakkasans’

William Conklin – Stony Point, NY; US Army, 11th Airborne Division

George D’Arcy – Liverpool, ENG; British Army, WWII, ETO, CBI & Africa, 2/South Lancashire Regiment

Homer Godair – Griffithville, AR; US Army, 11th Airborne Division

Scott Humbird – Brentwood, CA; US Army, WWII, PTO, Malaria Control Unit

Charles Pittman Sr. – Pensacola, FL; USMC, Vietnam, Silver Star, Distinguished Flying Cross, Purple Heart, Lt.General (Ret. 40 y.)

William Sartain – Mineral Wells, TX; US Merchant Marines, WWII, PTO

Mary Sweeney – Nanticoke, PA; US Army Air Corps WAC; WWII, Medical/Surgical Tech.

William Taylor – Grant, AL; US Army, Korea, 187th RCT “Rakkasans’

William Whiteman – Hood River, OR; US Navy, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Lt. Commander (Ret. 27 y.)

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Source: // Pacific Paratrooper

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided at https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

FEATURED: (VIRGINIA) A group of paleontologists say the tiny freckles they found on a rock could hold the key to understanding the origins of plant life on earth are actually billion-year-old seaweed microfossils #AceHistoryDesk report

#AceHistoryReport – Feb.26: The freckles, Virginia Tech researchers say, are actually billion-year-old seaweed microfossils: They substantially push back the current record of the multicellular green plant by nearly 200 million years, according to the study published on Monday. Previously, the oldest known fossilised green alga was 800 million years old.

Scientists found a billion-year-old fossil believed to be an ancestor of earth’s very first plants CNN Science

Scientists have found 1 billion-year-old seaweed fossils.Scientists have found 1 billion-year-old seaweed fossils.

The fossils are so tiny — about 2 millimeters in length or the size of a flea — that they are barely visible without a microscope. But despite their miniscule size, researchers said the microplants may have contributed to the evolution of the land plants that appeared nearly 550 million years later.

The green seaweed, a form of algae known as Proterocladus antiquus, was unearthed by post-doctoral researcher Qing Tang. Tang found the fossils in a rock near the city of Dailan in northern China using maps which show researchers where in the world they can find millions to billions-year-old rocks.

Once the rocks were found, they were shipped back to Virginia Tech’s paleontological lab where each one was analyzed under a microscope. To Tang’s surprise, what appeared as just “little brownish grey freckles on mudstone rocks” turned out to be the oldest multicellular green seaweed ever discovered.

“I was very excited when I found the first specimen of the seaweed fossil,” Tang told CNN. “I immediately showed it to my supervisor, Professor Shuhai Xiao at Virginia Tech, and we both agreed that this is something really important.”

A treasure worth celebrating

Shuhai Xiao, a paleobiologist and one of the researchers who led the study, told CNN the discovery deserved a celebration.

“This is a huge discovery,” Xiao said. “Algae like this makes oxygen which is a critical element in the atmosphere that allows us and animals to survive. They are also important plants to maintain the habitability of our planet.”

The seaweeds were green when they were alive, but were buried so deep and at such high temperatures for nearly 1 billion years they lost their color, according to Tang. When the seaweeds died, they were “cooked” beneath sediment and their organic remains imprinted on rock found on dry land that once was the ocean

An artist's reconstruction of the seafloor a billion years ago.

An artist’s reconstruction of the seafloor a billion years ago.

“These new fossils suggest that green seaweeds were important players in the ocean long before their land plant descendants moved and took control of dry land,” Xiao said in the news release. “The entire biosphere is largely dependent on plants and algae for food and oxygen, yet land plants did not evolve until about 450 million years ago.”

These fossils are related to the ancestors of the earliest land plants and trees that first developed 450 million years ago.

Although the issue is widely debated amongst scientists, the current hypothesis, according to Xiao, is that land plants such as trees, grass, and bushes, evolved from green seaweeds, an aquatic plant.

Throughout millions of years, the plants moved out of the water and adapted to dry land.

Without these photosynthetic plants, Earth would face an ecological imbalance if it weren’t for their ability to produce organic carbon and oxygen, as well as provide food and shelter for animals.

So, next time you eat, ponder for a moment the tiny seaweed that may have made it all possible, hundreds of millions of years ago.

#AceHistoryDesk report ………….Published: Feb.26: 2020:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided at https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com