FEATURED: Slavery Advertisements Published March 28, 1770

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Slavery Advertisements Published March 28, 1770

‘The Papermakers’ – Tullis Russell in film

The Tullis Russell Paper Mills Collection (ms38973) contains records in a variety of formats – paper, photographic, audio tapes, VHS tapes and film reels. Previous blogs on Echoes have highlighted different parts of this collection, including the oral history tapes. As part of our preservation of this collection, we have had digitised some of the promotional films (both reels and VHS) commissioned by the company from the 1950s to 1990s, allowing us to see some of the films for the first time. In this blog we will showcase a couple of these films.

‘The Papermakers’ – Tullis Russell in film

FEATURED: Slavery Advertisements Published March 23, 1770

The Slavery Adverts 250 Project: The Slavery Adverts 250 Project chronicles the role of newspaper advertising in perpetuating slavery in the era of the American Revolution. The project seeks to reveal the ubiquity of slavery in eighteenth-century life from New England to Georgia by republishing advertisements for slaves – for sale, wanted to purchase, runaways, captured fugitives – in daily digests on this site as well as in real time via the @SlaveAdverts250 Twitter feed, utilizing twenty-first-century media to stand in for the print media of the eighteenth century.

The project aims to provide modern audiences with a sense of just how often colonists encountered these advertisements in their daily lives. Enslaved men, women, and children appeared in print somewhere in the colonies almost every single day. Those advertisements served as a constant backdrop for social, cultural, economic, and political life in colonial and revolutionary America. Colonists who did not own slaves were still confronted with slavery as well as invited to maintain the system by purchasing slaves or assisting in the capture of runaways. The frequency of these newspaper advertisements suggests just how embedded slavery was in colonial and revolutionary American culture in everyday interactions beyond the printed page.

These advertisements also testify to the experiences of enslaved men, women, and children, though readers must consider that those experiences have been remediated through descriptions offered by slaveholders rather than the slaves themselves. Often unnamed in the advertisements, enslaved men, women, and children were not invisible or unimportant in early America.

These advertisements appeared in colonial American newspapers 250 years ago today.

Massachusetts-Gazette Extraordinary [Draper] (March 23, 1770).

Slavery Advertisements Published March 23, 1770

On Saint Benedict Day In 2020 #InaVukic

St Benedict of Norcia

Today, 21st March marks the day when in 547 AD Saint Benedict of Norcia, patron Saint of Europe, died.

Today, 21 March 2020 is the day that marks a need for exceptional courage and humanity due to COVID-19 (Coronavirus) devastation throughout the World. With the frightening onslaught of the coronavirus affecting multiple facets of people’s lives, one can easily fall into a tailspin of anxious thoughts and seemingly insurmountable fears. With so much suffering and discord dominating the headlines – and even our personal lives – we may miss all the good things happening around us. So, make an effort to find positive things around you, make an effort to make life easier for those you love and stay connected – virtually or in person; in personal contacts use caution – do not abandon!

St. Benedict used the family structure as the basis for his Rule for his monasteries. The community life of a monastery imitates the primary unit of society, a family.  Vice versa, the family can use the Rule as for guidelines for structure in daily life and prayer.

Founder of a monastery at Monte Cassino, between Rome and Naples, in the sixth century, St Benedict intended his Rule to be a practical guide to Christian monastic life. Based on the key precepts of humility, obedience and love, its aim is to create a harmonious and efficient religious community in which individuals can make progress in the Christian virtues and gain eternal life. Here, Benedict sets out ideal monastery routines and regulations, from the qualities of a good abbot, the twelve steps to humility and the value of silence to such everyday matters as kitchen duties, care of the sick and the suitable punishment for lateness at mealtimes. Benedict’s legacy is still strong – his Rule remains a source of inspiration and a key work in the history of the Christian church.

The Rule of St. Benedict is a timeless document – in so many ways as fresh and relevant as it was when it was written almost fifteen hundred years ago. Although written for monastics, many of the issues addressed in the Rule can be applied to life in the world outside the monastic community. The qualities which make up a valued life – humility, patience, simplicity, solitude, caring for others, and living in community – concern everyone. These specifics of the Rule, and the framework it provides, have great meaning for people who are seeking to live out their faith in the world today.

Many say that prayers will not stop the Coronavirus and they may be right but we must humble ourselves and remember what every faith tradition reveals: that God is present among the most vulnerable among us, and that if we act now to protect those at the bottom we have the greatest chance of protecting us all.

On that note here is a St. Benedict prayer:

“O Lord, I place myself in your hands and dedicate myself to you. I pledge myself to do your will in all things: To love the Lord God with all my heart, all my soul, all my strength.

Not to kill. Not to steal. Not to covet. Not to bear false witness. To honour all persons. Not to do to another what I would not wish done to myself. To relieve the poor. To clothe the naked. To help in trouble. To console the sorrowing.

Not to give way to anger. Not to foster a desire for revenge. Not to entertain deceit in the heart. Not to make a false peace. Not to forsake charity. To speak the truth with heart and tongue. Not to return evil for evil. To do no injury: yea, even to bear patiently any injury done to me. Not to curse those who curse me, but rather to bless them. To bear persecution for justice’s sake.

Not to be proud. Not to be lazy. Not to be slothful. Not to be a murmurer. Not to be a detractor.

To guard my tongue against wicked speech. To avoid much speaking. To avoid idle talk. To read only what is good to read. To look at only what is good to see. To pray often. To obey my superiors in all things rightful. Not to desire to be thought holy, but to seek holiness.

To fulfill the commandments of God by good works. To hate no one. Not to be jealous or envious of anyone. Not to love strife. Not to love pride. To honour the aged. To pray for my enemies. To make peace after a quarrel, before the setting of the sun. Never to despair of your mercy, O God of Mercy. Amen.”

To Saint Benedict I now plead and pray: Dear St Benedict please recommend my Friend Marko Franovic, an Australian Croat – a dedicated benefactor to multitudes in need in Croatia, in Australia and worldwide – to Jesus, who during His ministry on Earth showed His power and caring by healing people of all ages and stations of life from physical, mental, and spiritual ailments. Be present, dear Jesus, now to people who need Your loving touch because of COVID-19. May they feel Your power of healing through the care of doctors and nurses. May Your miracle of healing touch my friend Marko.

Ina Vukic

On Saint Benedict Day In 2020

Snippets of History: On March 18, 1965, the Soviet spacecraft Voshkod-2 launched from its base in Baikonur, in modern day Kazakhstan, onboard were two cosmonauts AceHistoryDesk report

In March 1965, at the age of 30, Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov made the first spacewalk in history, beating out American rival Ed White on Gemini 4 by almost three months: Floating outside his tiny Voskhod 2 capsule for 10 exhilarating minutes, Leonov felt, he writes, “like a seagull with its wings outstretched, soaring high above the Earth.” In keeping with the secrecy of the Soviet space program, few people—not even his family—knew about the spacewalk ahead of time.

The Nightmare of Voskhod 2

A cosmonaut remembers the exhilaration — and terror — of his first space mission.

moon.jpg__600x0_q85_upscale.jpgVoskhod 2 was Leonov’s first spaceflight. Before becoming a cosmonaut, he flew MiGs. (NASA )By Alexei Leonov

Even less well known was how close Leonov and his crewmate, Pavel (Pasha) Belyayev, came to dying that day.

In his recently published book, Two Sides of the Moon, written with U.S. Apollo astronaut David Scott, Leonov recounts the spacewalk and its even more dramatic aftermath.

Read Full Report Here: https://www.airspacemag.com/space/the-nightmare-of-voskhod-2-8655378/

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided at https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com

Snippet of History Courtesy of Kindness: The photograph on this post shows Australian soldiers on the Western Front suffering from trench foot during the winter of 1916, being carried by fellow soldiers #AceHistoryDesk reports

Many soldiers were evacuated from the front line suffering with trench foot. Prolonged exposure to damp, unsanitary, and cold conditions caused boils and sores, which could lead to fungal infections, gangrene, and even amputation. Keeping one’s feet dry and regularly changing one’s socks were two ways to help stop the spread of trench foot.

Many people back home sewed or knitted warm clothing, including socks, for family and friends at the front. Knitters often included notes or poems with the items they made. Sometimes a correspondence would develop with the soldiers which could continue through the war.

Other diseases such as influenza, typhoid, trench fever, malaria and diabetes were present during the war, caused by exposure to wet and damp conditions. Two out of three soldiers died in battle, the rest died due to infections or disease.

Lest We Forget.

Photograph and some information comes from the Australian War Memorial. Image file number AWM E00081.

The photograph on this post shows Australian soldiers on the Western Front suffering from trench foot during the winter of 1916, being carried by …

FEATURED: (ZURICH, Switzerland.) Defence Ministry Report: People in the village Mitholz have been told they may have to leave their homes for more than a decade while a nearby WW2 weapons store is cleared as 3,500-tonnes of ammunition remain: Work is expected to start in 2031 #AceHistoryDesk report

#AceHistoryReport – Mar.10: Nine people died in 1947 and many properties were destroyed after an explosion at an underground armoury in Mitholz, where 3,500 tonnes of ammunition remain: Switzerland’s defence ministry said the chance of another blast had been underestimated for decades, and that the risk to residents had now become “unacceptable”.

Swiss village facing 10-year evacuation over Second World War weapons threat

The Swiss government says the chance of a blast in Mitholz has been underestimated for decades and the risk is “unacceptable”. ………SkyNews – Tania Snuggs

The defence ministry said it expects the actual clearing work “to begin in 2031 after extensive preparations” A major road through the village may also have to be rerouted, affecting connections between Kandergrund and the high-altitude resort village of Kandersteg…………….A public consultation is under way, with residents and local businesses able to have their say on the plans until 17 April………………………On its website, the Swiss defence ministry said it would offer support to those affected, and that they would “seek to talk to individuals and families”…………………It added that if the evacuation were to “pose insurmountable problems”, or “did not meet the protection objectives”, it would still be possible to significantly reduce the risks by “covering the installation with a rock mass”.

‘ Various systems have been installed inside and around the former ammunition depot, making it possible to measure in particular temperature variations, gas emissions and rock movements ‘

The canton of Bern has also drawn up an emergency plan……

#AceHistoryDesk report …………Published: Mar.10: 2020:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided at https://t.me/acenewsdaily and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com