FEATURED: HAPPY HOLIDAY WISH FOR ALL !! Poems (2) // Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

SANTA PARATROOPER

Merry Christmas and Happy Hanukkah to everyone out there !! May you all find the Peace and Happiness you deserve.

href=”https://pacificparatrooper.files.wordpress.com/2019/12/1944-xmas1-e1576953670498.jpg”>

A 1944 Christmas

From: Pacific Paratrooper to ALL !!!

Cherish His Christmas

by Roger J. Robicheau

Dedicated to our military…

Christmas brings such a time of love
Each tender heart holds so much of

Unselfishness thrives, trust is strong
The purpose to give, send love along

A time of pleasantries, patience too
Good wishes to all, all feelings true

Thankfulness follows each fine deed
Gifts from our God, never from greed

Great the rewards that joy does bring
Like the beauty in hearing angels sing

We pray for our loved, each so dear
Especially those who can’t be near

Many leave home to bravely serve
All freedoms we have, they preserve

Do pray for our troops, as we should
And their families too, if you would

Give thanks to our Lord, His only Son
And cherish His Christmas, everyone

©2004Roger J. Robicheau

Please do me one favor and click on last year’s post – Right Here !

From Charly Priest to Smitty – CLICK HERE!!

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Military Humor –

Easton, MD–Dec. 22, 2011–This is a Christmas display at the home of Tom and Alice Blair, which includes an F 104 jet, staff photo/Barbara Haddock Taylor} [Sun Photographer] #9306

Click on images to enlarge.

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Farewell Salutes –

Thomas Anderson – Los Angeles, CA; US Army, WWII & Korea

Bill Bjorson – Canfield, OH; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, Co. A/511/11th Airborne Division

Roland Duffany – Pawtucket, RI; US Army, WWII, SSgt., Purple Heart

Robert Gibbons – Denver, CO; US Navy, WWII, PTO

Samuel Jones – London, ENG; Royal Navy, WWII, ETO, gunner, HMS Zulu

Shuso “Shoes” Kumata – IL; US Army, WWII, PTO, Occupation interpreter

Thomas Lovell – St. George, UT; US Navy, WWII, PTO

Tetsuo Matsumoto – Lodi, CA; US Army, WWII, ETO, SSgt., 100/442nd RCT

George A. Sakheim – Brn: GER; US Army, WWII, ETO, Military Intelligence & interpreter

Wiley Tanner – Radium, KS; US Army, WWII

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Source: // Pacific Paratrooper

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News here: https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts as a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews

#OnThisDay 1896 Soviet and Polish Marshal Konstantin #Rokossovsky was born in Warsaw. In the Army since #WWI . By the end of #WWII he was heading the 2nd Belorussian Front. On the 24 June 1945 he commanded the Victory Parade in Moscow ➡️ #AceNewsDesk reports

#AceHistoryReport – Dec.21: Konstantin Rokossovsky was born in Velikie Luki, a small Russian town not far from Pskov: His father, a man of Polish origin, was a railway machinist, and his mother was a Russian schoolteacher………………Soon after Konstantin’s birth the family moved to Warsaw. Konstantin was just 5 years old when his father died in a railway accident………….The family was left aground; they were very poor and Konstantin was forced to abandon his studies after grade 4 to work in a factory producing stockings. In 1911 Konstantin’s mother died…………The boy and his little sister Helena were left orphans. Konstantin kept working as an unskilled labourer…………………However, he found time to read many books in both Russian and Polish. 

Prominent Russians: Konstantin Rokossovsky

December 21, 1896 – August 3, 1968
Image from panzerfrontbis.narod.ruImage from panzerfrontbis.narod.ru
RT @RusEmbUSA: #OTD in 1896, Soviet and Polish Marshal Konstantin #Rokossovsky was born in Warsaw. In the Army since #WWI. By the end of #WWII he was heading the 2nd Belorussian Front. On the 24 June 1945 he commanded the Victory Parade in Moscow ➡️ https://t.co/JXpa79xJQm #InformationBulletin https://t.co/llIyZ19y9f http://twitter.com/mfa_russia/status/1208432485408874497 December 21, 2019 at 05:02PM:

When World War I broke out Konstantin Rokossovsky joined the Russian regiment that moved through Warsaw to the west: He was almost 18 years old by then, and was warmly welcomed by the regiment. He started as a private soldier, but thanks to his military talent, courage and leadership he soon became a junior non-commissioned officer. He remained as such until October 1917. That’s when Rokossovsky joined the Communist Party and entered the Red Army. Step by step, the young and ambitious man advanced to the rank of battalion commander. He played an active role in defeating the White Guard, including the troops headed by Alexander Kolchak. For his outstanding results Rokossovsky received the Order of the Red Banner, which was the highest military decoration in Soviet Russia.

In 1923 Rokossovsky married Julia Barmina, and in 1925 their daughter Ariadna was born: After two years of studying at the Higher Cavalry Commander School, Rokossovsky was invited to serve as an instructor in the Mongolian army. He spent several years defending the Chinese Eastern Railway until it was sold to Japan in 1935.

In August 1937 Rokossovsky was falsely accused of having connections with the Japanese and Polish secret services: He was arrested and put in prison. Rokossovsky spent three years in the ruefully famous jailhouse “The Crosses” (“Kresty”) in Leningrad. Despite imprisonment and torture, he remained courageous and denied all charges. In 1940 Rokossovsky was released. After meeting with Stalin, Rokossovsky was reestablished in the Red Army and in the Communist Party. Soon after he was given the rank of major general.

When World War II started and the Nazis attacked the USSR, Rokossovsky commanded the 9th Mechanized Corps: Despite a lack of tanks, the troops headed by Rokossovsky wore out the enemy and retreated only upon order. Rokossovsky was promoted and became the commander of the 16th Army that was obliged to protect the Volokolamsk approach to Moscow. It was an extremely difficult task due to a lack of soldiers and transportation. However, Rokossovsky managed to maintain an unbroken defense line. Rokossovsky proved himself as a gifted commander. The Nazi plan for a quick Moscow capture collapsed. Rokossovsky was honored with the Lenin Order.

Image from vgd.ruImage from vgd.ru

In March 1942 Rokossovsky was badly injured by a shell splinter. He spent two months in a Moscow hospital, but as soon as he got well he took command of the 16th Army again: In September 1942 Lieutenant General Konstantin Rokossovsky was appointed commander of the Stalingrad Front (also known as the Don Front). He was among those who elaborated the so-called “Uranium Plan” which resulted in the capture and defeat of the 6th German army headed by field marshal von Paulus. The 6th Army’s attack on Stalingrad was stopped. For his deeds, Rokossovsky received the Suvorov Order.

In February 1943 Rokossovsky wrote in his diary: “I’m appointed commander of the Central Front: It means that Stalin has entrusted me to play the key part in the summer Kursk campaign.” Actually, Rokossovsky was responsible for stopping the Nazi’s attack in the outskirts of Kursk in 1943. It was the turning point of the whole of World War II. Rokossovsky showed himself as a brilliant strategist. Using Soviet secret service data, he managed to define the exact point of the Nazi’s principal thrust and organized a strong defense line. Rokossovsky guaranteed victory in the Kursk Battle. Soon after that, he was promoted to colonel general and finally general.

Konstantin Rokossovsky went on to become one of the most talented Soviet commanders: He confirmed his status during the operation of Belorussia’s liberation known as “Bagration.” It was the strongest attack in the history of both world wars. Some historians believe that Stalin called Rokossovsky “my Bagration.” As soon as operation “Bagration” had been successfully completed, Rokossovsky was given the Diamond Star of the Soviet Union Marshal. Afterwards Rokossovsky, as commander of the 1st Belorussian Front, participated in the liberation of Poland, which he considered to be his native land.

By the end of World War II Konstantin Rokossovsky was heading the 2nd Belorussian Front. It was Rokossovsky who commanded the Victory Parade in Moscow on the 24 June 1945:

After the end of World War II, Stalin ordered Rokossovsky to re-organize the Polish army: Rokossovsky became Polish Minister of National Defense and remained as such until 1956 when he became Minister of National Defense in the USSR, but only for a brief time. The new leader of the Soviet Union, Nikita Khrushchev, demoted him after Rokossovsky declined to write an article about Stalin’s crimes. Some historians believe that Rokossovsky refused because he respected Stalin deeply, others think that he just didn’t want to interfere in politics. However, shortly before his death Rokossovsky wrote his memoirs “A Solder’s duty.”

Konstantin Rokossosky died 3 August 1968: He is buried in the Kremlin Wall Necropolis located on the Red Square in Moscow.

#AceHistoryDesk reports ……….Published: Dec.21: 2019: Written by Alyona Kipreyeva for RT

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News here: https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts as a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews

Featured Report: Christmas poems for our military (1) // Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

Sailor Santa

“A Different Christmas Poem”

The embers glowed softly, and in their dim light,
I gazed round the room and I cherished the sight.
My wife was asleep, her head on my chest,
My daughter beside me, angelic in rest.

Outside the snow fell, a blanket of white,
Transforming the yard to a winter delight.
The sparkling lights in the tree I believe,
Completed the magic that was Christmas Eve.

My eyelids were heavy, my breathing was deep,
Secure and surrounded by love I would sleep.
In perfect contentment, or so it would seem,
So I slumbered, perhaps I started to dream.

The sound wasn’t loud, and it wasn’t too near,
But I opened my eyes when it tickled my ear.
Perhaps just a cough, I didn’t quite know,
Then the sure sound of footsteps outside in the snow.

My soul gave a tremble, I struggled to hear,
And I crept to the door just to see who was near.
Standing out in the cold and the dark of the night,
A lone figure stood, his face weary and tight.

091202-N-5339S-693
GROTON, Conn. (Dec. 2, 2009) Santa Claus stands with Sailors aboard the Los Angeles-class fast attack submarine USS Miami (SSN 755) during the submarineÕs return to Naval Submarine Base New London after an eight-month deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Electronics Technician John Sabados/Released)

A soldier, I puzzled, some twenty years old,
Perhaps a Marine, huddled here in the cold.
Alone in the dark, he looked up and smiled,
Standing watch over me, and my wife and my child.

“What are you doing?” I asked without fear,
“Come in this moment, it’s freezing out here!
Put down your pack, brush the snow from your sleeve,
You should be at home on a cold Christmas Eve!”

For barely a moment I saw his eyes shift,
Away from the cold and the snow blown in drifts..

To the window that danced with a warm fire’s light
Then he sighed and he said “Its really all right,

I’m out here by choice. I’m here every Night.”

“It’s my duty to stand at the front of the line,
That separates you from the darkest of times.
No one had to ask or beg or implore me,
I’m proud to stand here like my fathers before me.

My Gramps died at “Pearl on a day in December,”
Then he sighed, “That’s a Christmas ‘Gram always remembers.”
My dad stood his watch in the jungles of “Nam”,
And now it is my turn and so, here I am.

I’ve not seen my own son
In more than a while,
But my wife sends me pictures;
He’s sure got her smile.

Then he bent and he carefully pulled from his bag,
The red, white, and blue… an American flag.
I can live through the cold and the being alone,
Away from my family, my house and my home.

I can stand at my post through the rain and the sleet,
I can sleep in a foxhole with little to eat.
I can carry the weight of killing another,
Or lay down my life with my sister and brother..

Who stand at the front against any and all,
To ensure for all time that this flag will not fall.”
“So go back inside,” he said, “harbor no fright,
Your family is waiting and I’ll be all right.”

“But isn’t there something I can do, at the least,
“Give you money,” I asked, “or prepare you a feast?
It seems all too little for all that you’ve done,
For being away from your wife and your son.”

Then his eye welled a tear that held no regret,

“Just tell us you love us, and never forget.
To fight for our rights back at home while we’re gone,
To stand your own watch, no matter how long.

For when we come home, either standing or dead,
To know you remember we fought and we bled.
Is payment enough, and with that we will trust,
That we mattered to you as you mattered to us.”

LCDR Jeff Giles, SC, USN
30th Naval Construction Regiment
OIC, Logistics Cell One
Al Taqqadum, Iraq

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE.

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Military Humor –

Easton, MD–Dec. 22, 2011–This is a Christmas display at the home of Tom and Alice Blair, which includes an F 104 jet, staff photo/Barbara Haddock Taylor} [Sun Photographer] #9306

Aboard the USS Nimitz

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Farewell Salutes –

Arnold Arons – Vacaville, CA; US Navy, WWII / US Air Force, Korea & Vietnam, (Ret. 30 y.)

John Bayens – Louisville, KY; USMC, WWII, PTO, Pfc., Co B/1/6/2nd Marine Division, KIA (Tarawa)

Joseph Cuda – NE; US Army Air Corps, WWII

Glenn R, Goff III – Hardeesville, SC; US Army, Vietnam, specialist

Francis Jackson – Oak Mills, KS; USMC, WWII, PTO, Korea & Vietnam, MSgt. (Ret. 30 y.)

Richard Little – Mobile, AL; US Navy, WWII, USS Henry W. Tucker / US Air Force, Korea

Maurice Mounsdon (101) – Litchfield, ENG; RAF, WWII, Lt., pilot, 56th Squadron “The Few”

Michael Soares – New Bern, NC; US Army, WWII, ETO, 2nd Lt., tank commander / US Navy (Ret. 25 y.)

Gordon Whitlow – Sioux Falls, SD; Merchant Marines, WWII / US Air Force, Korea

John Voogt – Newport, RI; US Navy, WWII, Korea & Vietnam

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Source: // Pacific Paratrooper

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News here: https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts as a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews

Featured Report: Smitty in December 1945 w/ the Sword Story // Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

Christmas card

This was the Christmas card sent from Japan to Broad Channel, New York in December 1945. Anna Smith had been waiting to hear this news from her son Everett (Smitty) for over three years. On the back, it reads:

“Dear Mom:
This is the best Xmas card I’ve sent to you since getting in the army. I figured this would be what you have always been waiting to see, here it goes.

“I’m finally on my way, so don’t send any more mail.
Love, Everett
“P.S. I’ll keep you posted on my various stops.”

Smitty in Japan, at far right

Even though Smitty had earned his points to go home, he was still an NCO on General Swing’s staff and was required to finish out his duties as such. After going through combat in the South Pacific, it would be in peaceful occupational Japan where Smitty’s temper would get the better of him.

Non-nonchalantly going about his business at the headquarters of Camp Schimmelpfennig, Smitty just happened to glance through the glass partition that sealed off Gen. Swing’s office. Inside was an officer holding and admiring the Japanese sword that his commander intended to keep and bring home as a souvenir. Smitty didn’t think much of it at the time; he was busy and many people commented on the weapon. so he continued down the hallway. A short while later, the entire office could hear the general demanding to know what had become of his sword. It was gone.

Gen. Swing accepts Japanese sword at Atsugi Airfield

Major General Joseph Swing

My father didn’t think twice, this was his general. He went into the room and told Swing what he had witnessed. Without a second thought, the two men went to the other man’s office, but neither the man or sword was there. The officer in question showed a few moments later. When the general explained why they were waiting for him, the officer became indignant and professed his innocence (just a tad too much). My father said the air of tension in the room became thick enough to use a

Postcards received from a Cavite, P.I. woman

machete on. This was when Smitty’s temper went out of control and with one right cross – sent the officer through his own glass partition.

Of course, this action made it necessary to bust Smitty back down to private, but he didn’t care about that. He was still furious that the sword was never returned. It all could have gone worse if the general had not been there or if he did not believe Smitty’s word. Smitty said it was worth being busted just to wipe the smirky grin off the officer’s face. The officer, I believe, was a replacement and had not seen much (if any) combat, just a blow-heart. Smitty later offered his two Japanese swords to General Swing, but he refused. My father didn’t believe the general would have taken the Emperor’s own sword as a replacement. I can clearly see my father’s face contort when he thought of the thief and he would say, “That know-nothing mattress salesman from Texas!” I’m sure it was for the best that the two men never met again stateside as civilians.

Unfortunately, a similar incident occurred to my father. As he happily began packing to go home, Smitty noticed that an expensive set of carved ivory chop sticks he had purchased somehow had disappeared. They also were never recovered. (I had often wondered if the two incidents had been related, but I suppose we’ll never know.)

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Military Humor –

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Farewell Salutes –

Daniel Aiello – NYC, NY; US Army / Actor

Vernon Bartley – brn: Meerut, India/ENG; Punjab Army, WWII, CBI

John Cameron – Waipukurau, NZ; RNZ Navy, WWII, minesweeper

Frank Crane – Toledo, OH; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, 11th Airborne Division

Joseph Haratani – Florin, CA; US Army, WWII, ETO, 442nd RCT

Clarence Katwyk – Salt Lake City, UT; US Merchant Marines / US Army, WWII, PTO

Dominic Moschetti – Victor, CO; US Army, WWII, TSgt., 354th Infantry

Raymond Plassmann – CT; US Army Air Corps, WWII, B-17 navigator

Arthur Schaefer – Tucson, AZ; US Army Air Corps, WWII, Lt., B-17 navigator

Orland Webb – Harrodsburg, KY; US Army, WWII

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Source: // Pacific Paratrooper

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News here: https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts as a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews

FEATURED: (NEW YORK) Original Olympic manifesto written by International Olympic Committee co-founder Pierre de Coubertin in 1892 sells for more than $12 million in an auction at Sotheby’s and becomes the mos t expensive piece of ‘ sports memorabilia ‘ ever sold #AceHistoryDesk reports

#AceHistoryReport – Dec.19: The original Olympic manifesto outlining the foundation of the modern Games has become the most expensive piece of sports memorabilia ever sold, fetching $US8.8 million ($12.8m) at auction in New York.

Key points:

  • The handwritten manuscript is a 14-page speech delivered by the co-founder of the International Olympic Committee
  • The original had never been seen by the public before
  • A New York Yankees jersey worn by Babe Ruth was previously the most expensive item of sports memorabilia

14 handwritten pages are spread out across a white backgroundPhoto: The original Olympic manifesto written by Pierre de Coubertin. (Supplied: Sotheby’s)

Experts had expected the item to sell for up to $US1m: But the price was jacked up during a three-way bidding war which lasted more than 12 minutes, according to auctioneer Sotheby’s………The Olympic manifesto was written by International Olympic Committee co-founder Pierre de Coubertin in 1892.

What’s in the manifesto?

The 14-page handwritten manuscript is the only known copy of a speech delivered by Coubertin at the Sorbonne University in Paris in 1892.

A black and white photo of a man in a suitPhoto: Pierre de Coubertin was the co-founder of the International Olympic Committee. (Supplied: Sotheby’s)

While a high-quality copy of the manifesto was displayed at Copenhagen City Hall during the 2009 Olympic Congress, the original had never been seen by the public.

The fragile notepaper pages feature Coubertin’s scribbled edits and crossed out phrases.

Not only does the document outline his rationale for resurrecting the Greek Games, it advocates for athletic pursuits to no longer be restricted to military training.

Coubertin believed athletic endeavour had benefits for individuals and society.

It was his idea to make the ancient Olympic Games become a new, international competition.

Four years after the manifesto was written, the first modern Games were held in Athens.

A black and white photo of men about to race at the Olympics in 1896Photo: A 100-metre race at the 1896 Olympic Games in Athens. (Supplied: Benaki Museum Collection)

‘The modern Olympics really comes down to this one man’

“Today’s record result stands as a testament to Pierre de Coubertin’s vision of more than a century ago, and the reverence with which the Olympic Games are still held,” Sotheby’s senior specialist Selby Kiffer said in a statement.

“This marks my highest price on the rostrum in more than three decades at Sotheby’s.”

“One of the great fundamentals of the Olympic Games is that nations can compete against one another without going to war,” said Richard Austin, head of Sotheby’s Books & Manuscripts Department in New York.

“You really get a sense of the immediacy of this draft,” he added.

“The modern Olympics really comes down to this one man.”

Previous sports memorabilia sold

A black and white photo of Babe Ruth standing in the dugout during a baseball game in 1929Photo: Babe Ruth’s jersey was previously the most expensive item of sports memorabilia. (AP: File photo)

Historical sports memorabilia pieces have always sold for a hefty price.

A New York Yankees jersey worn by Babe Ruth was previously the most expensive item of memorabilia, selling for $US5.6 million in June.

James Naismith’s Founding Rules of Basketball sold for more than $US4.3 million in 2010.

The historic document, which was typed on paper but also contained handwritten notes, was also sold by Sotheby’s.

#AceHistoryDesk reports …………Published: Dec.19: 2019: Reuters/ABC

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News here: https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts as a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews

FEATURED: Charles Dickens’s stoic response to the destruction of his Christmas turkey in a train fir e has been revealed in a letter rediscovered at the National Railway Museum in York, in which the author say s he “bore the loss with unbroken good humour towards the Great Western Railway Company” #Ac eHistoryDesk reports

#AceHistoryReport – Dec.18: Dickens, whose love for the seasonal bird came through in books such as A Christmas Carol, was sent the turkey in Christmas week of 1869 by the manager of his reading tours, George Dolby: Dickens was often given a turkey as a Christmas present; according to Dolby’s memoirs, this particular bird weighed 30lb. The festive package took wing from Ross-on-Wye in good time to reach the author on Christmas Eve, but Dickens sent an urgent message to Dolby that day: “WHERE IS THAT TURKEY? IT HAS NOT ARRIVED!!!!!!!!!!!”

The turkey had been moved, along with other parcels, to a horse-box carriage in Gloucester, which had subsequently caught fire. The charred remains were later offered to the people of Reading, for sixpence a portion: According to Dolby, Dickens was initially annoyed, but later saw it as a blessing that what was left of the bird had not been wasted, said Anne McLean, an archive volunteer at the museum.
Letter from Charles Dickens to Mr J.C. Kingett, Great Western Railway, Saturday 5th February 1870. ‘Sir, In reply to your letter I beg to say that I have no doubt my Christmas fare was destroyed by an unavoidable accident, and that I bore the loss with unbroken good humour towards the Great Western Railway Company. Faithfully Yours, Charles Dickens’. Letter is signed with his customary flourish and the letterhead refers to his country home Gad’s Hill Place in Kent. National Railway Museum (DIC).
The letter from Dickens to James Charles Kingett of the Great Western Railway, written in February 1870. Photograph: National Railway Museum

The Great Western Railway company, via superintendent James Charles Kingett of the Up Parcels Department at Paddington station in London apologised to Dickens: The author replied in February 1870 that “I have no doubt my Christmas fare was destroyed by an unavoidable accident, and that I bore the loss with unbroken good humour towards the Great Western Railway Company”.

This was Dickens’s last Christmas, as he died in June 1870:

Dickens’s reply had been printed on Kingett’s retirement in 1908 in the Great Western Railway magazine, but had been forgotten in the museum’s 3km of archive shelving, which spans 200 years: It was found during a reappraisal of the collection, and is now on display.

Lead curator Ed Bartholomew called the letter a hidden gem: “The bleak irony of this discovery is that the man who did so much to shape our Christmas experiences may himself have been left with an empty stomach on his last ever Christmas day……………….Hard times indeed,” he said.

“Is it likely that Dickens was able to get a replacement turkey in time for his Christmas dinner?” asked McLean. “We know from A Christmas Carol that it was possible to buy one on Christmas morning, as Mr Scrooge did for the Cratchit family, but the great Dickens might have had to make do with a humble goose.”

#AceHistoryDesk reports …………..Published: Guardian .Com/ By Alison Flood on Wed 18 Dec 2019:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News here: https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts as a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews

#OnThisDay (BASTOGNE, Belgium. ) Side by side, the Allies and former enemy Germany together marked the 75th anniversary of one of the most important battles in World War II — the Battle of the Bulge, which st opped Adolf Hitler’s last-ditch offensive to turn the tide of the war #AceHistoryDesk reports

#AceHistoryReport – Dec.16: #OnThisDay ………..Germans would like to thank the United States of America……………The American armed forces, together with their allies, liberated Europe and they also liberated Germany. We thank you,” Steinmeier said: At dawn on Dec. 16, 1944, over 200,000 German soldiers started the most unexpected breakthrough through the dense woods of Belgium and Luxembourg’s hilly Ardennes. Making the most of the surprise move, the cold, freezing weather and wearied U.S. troops, the Germans pierced the front line so deeply it came to be known as the Battle of the Bulge:


Initially outnumbered, U.S. troops delayed the attack enough in fierce fighting to allow reinforcements to stream in and turn the tide of the battle by Christmas: After a month of fighting, the move into Germany was unstoppable:

U.S. Secretary of Defense Mark Esper paid tribute to over 19,000 U.S. troops who died in one of the bloodiest battles in the nation’s history: “Their efforts not only defended America but also ensured that the peoples of Europe would be free again,” Esper said, calling the Battle of the Bulge “one of the greatest in American history.”

U.S. Army veteran Malcolm “Buck” Marsh took the tributes in stride Monday as he addressed royalty, military leaders and top government officials: “It is great to be here but I’m glad I’m not digging a foxhole,” Marsh said.

Even though German deaths also exceeded well over 10,000 in the battle that stretched deep into January, German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier took special time to thank the U.S. troops.

RT @AP_Europe: VIDEO: The Battle of the Bulge stopped Hitler’s last-ditch attempt to turn the tide of the war. Click here for the full story about the 75th anniversary of the battle: https://t.co/yA620I0Pry https://t.co/ZGB7T99hwT http://twitter.com/AP/status/1206657773712367616 IFTTT, [Dec 16, 2019 at 19:53]

“Those who died were victims of hatred, delusion, and a destructive fury that originated from my country,” he said.

Germany is now an ally of the United States and its wartime partners in NATO. During the poignant ceremonies at the star-shaped Mardasson memorial in Bastogne, the current discord between the United States and several European allies over trade and security were never mentioned.

Even if it was a relatively warm 6 degrees Celsius (43 F) as opposed to the shivering conditions 75 years ago, the commemoration took place under leaden skies and rain with fog hanging low.

Hitler had hoped the advance would change the course of World War II by forcing U.S. and British troops to sue for peace, thus freeing Germany to focus on the rapidly advancing Soviet armies in the east.

Out of the blue at dawn, over 200,000 German troops counter-attacked across the front line in Belgium and Luxembourg, smashing into battle-weary U.S. soldiers positioned in terrain as foreign to them as it was familiar to the Germans.

Yet somehow, the Americans blunted the advance and started turning back the enemy for good, setting Allied troops on a roll that would end the war in Europe less than five months later.

This battle gained fame not so much for the commanders’ tactics but for the resilience of small units hampered by poor communications that stood shoulder to shoulder to deny Hitler the quick breakthrough he so desperately needed. Even though the Americans were often pushed back, they were able to delay the German advance in its crucial initial stages.

“It was ultimately the intrepid, indomitable spirit of the American solider that brought victory,” Esper said.

When the fortunes of war turned, it was most visible in the southern Ardennes town of Bastogne, where surrounded U.S. troops were cut off for days with little ammunition or food.

When Brig. Gen. Anthony C. McAuliffe of the 101st Airborne received a Dec. 22 ultimatum to surrender or face total destruction, he offered one of the most famous — and brief — replies in military history: “”Nuts.” Four days later, U.S. troops broke the Nazi encirclement.

“News of their fierce defense quickly spread, boosting the morale of allied forces all along the Western Front,” Esper said.

After the fighting in the Battle of the Bulge ended on Jan. 28, 1945, Allied forces invaded Germany, eventually leading to the Nazi surrender and the end of the war in Europe.

___

Casert reported from Brussels. Photojournalist Virginia Mayo contributed from Hamm, Luxembourg.

#AceHistoryDesk reports……………..Published: Dec.16: 2019:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News here: https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts as a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews

FEATURED: Battle of Ridgefield: Human skeletal remains possibly belonging to Revolutionary War soldiers have been discovered under an 18th-century house being renovated in Connecticut, according to The News-Times on Wednesday #AceHistoryDesk reports

#AceHistoryReport – Dec.14: The Connecticut Office of State Archaeology was notified by the medical examiner’s office of bones found under the basement of the Ridgefield home on Dec. 02, The News-Times of Danbury reported Wednesday.………….Subsequent excavations by state archaeologist Nicholas Bellantoni yielded two more skeletons: All three were “robust adult men lying in an east-west orientation in ground that appears to be haphazardly dug,” Bellantoni said.

Photo Courtesy of NY Post “Artist depiction of the Battle of Ridgefield.
Ridgefield Historical Society” https://t.co/y8Uq9TyHYC

The bone size indicates they were probably men, he said: One of the other reasons Bellantoni and his team believe the bones belong to Revolutionary War soldiers is that they found five buttons. No weapons were found.

The town is the site of the Battle of Ridgefield in April 1777: If confirmed, the discovery would be the first time that Revolutionary War-era soldiers from the field of battle have been recovered in Connecticut, he said: The original house was built around 1790, according to Sharon Dunphy, president of the the Ridgefield Historical Society……….Several additions were made to the home over the years, one of which was built over the burial site.

#AceHistoryDesk reports ………Published: Dec.14: 2019:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News here: https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts as a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews

(FEATURED) (Indonesia) A painting discovered on the wall of a cave has been found to be 44,000 years old: The art appears to show a buffalo being hunted by part-human, part-animal creatures holding spears and possibly ropes: Some researchers think the scene could be the world’s oldest-recorded story #AceHistoryDesk reports

#AceHistoryReport – Dec.12: A painting discovered on the wall of an Indonesian cave has been found to be 44,000 years old: The art appears to show a buffalo being hunted by part-human, part-animal creatures holding spears and possibly ropes: Some researchers think the scene could be the world’s oldest-recorded story.

Maxime Aubert / PA WIRE

The findings were presented in the journal Nature by archaeologists from Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia: Adam Brumm – an archaeologist at Griffith – first saw the pictures two years ago, after a colleague in Indonesia shimmied up a fig tree to reach the cave passage…………”These images appeared on my iPhone,” said Mr Brumm. “I think I said the characteristic Australian four-letter word out very loud.”

The Indonesian drawing is not the oldest in the world: Last year, scientists said they found “humanity’s oldest drawing” on a fragment of rock in South Africa, dated at 73,000 years old.

What do the drawings show?

The drawings were found in a cave called Leang Bulu’Sipong 4 in the south of Sulawesi, an Indonesian island east of Borneo.

The panel is almost five metres wide and appears to show a type of buffalo called an anoa, plus wild pigs found on Sulawesi.

Alongside them are smaller figures that look human – but also have animal features such as tails and snouts.

In one section, an anoa is flanked by several figures holding spears.

“I’ve never seen anything like this before,” said Mr Brumm. “I mean, we’ve seen hundreds of rock art sites in this region – but we’ve never seen anything like a hunting scene.”

However, other researchers have questioned whether the panel represents a single story – and say it could be a series of images painted over a longer period.

“Whether it’s a scene is questionable,” says Paul Pettitt, an archaeologist and rock-art specialist at Durham University told Nature.

How do we know it’s 44,000 years old?

The team analysed calcite “popcorn” that had built up on the painting.

Radioactive uranium in the mineral slowly decays into thorium, so the team measured the levels of different isotopes of these elements.

They found the calcite on a pig began forming at least 43,900 years ago, and the deposits on two buffalo were at least 40,900 years old.

There are at least 242 caves or shelters with ancient imagery in Sulawesi alone – and new sites are being discovered annually.

How does it compare to other prehistoric art?

It may not be the oldest drawing, but researchers say it could be the oldest story ever found:

“Previously, rock art found in European sites dated to around 14,000 to 21,000 years old were considered to be the world’s oldest clearly narrative artworks,” said the paper in Nature.

The Sulawesi drawings could also be the oldest animal drawing ever found.

Last year, a cave painting in Borneo – thought to be the oldest of an animal – was found to be at least 40,000 years old.

#AceNewsDesk reports …………Published: Dec.12: 2019:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News here: https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts as a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews

FEATURED: In the Monarchs first Christmas speech in 1952 aged 26, just months after the death of her father, King George VI: The Royal Family’s Instagram account has shared a throwback to the Queen’s first televised speech in 1957 according to @MailOnline #AceHistoryDesk reports

#AceHistoryReport – Dec.10: The monarch, now 93, was given the daunting task of delivering the first Christmas speech in 1952 aged 26, just months after the death of her father, King George VI: And five years later, at 31, Queen Elizabeth gave her first televised Christmas speech from Buckingham Palace, calling it a landmark day’ and giving a nod to her grandfather George V for starting the festive tradition on the radio: This week the Queen’s Instagram shared a throwback to the black and white speech, with fans commenting on how young she looked.

The Royal Family's Instagram account has shared a throwback to the Queen's first televised speech in 1957

The Royal Family’s Instagram account has shared a throwback to the Queen’s first televised speech in 1957

Dressed in a glitzy evening gown and the three-string pearl necklace gifted to her by her father King George when she turned 21 – a piece the monarch still wears – the Queen can be seen sitting by the piano, alongside a framed picture of Prince Charles and Princess Anne: The Queen says: ‘Twenty-five years ago, my grandfather broadcast the first of these messages: ‘Today is another landmark, because television has made it possible for many of you to see me in your homes on Christmas Day.’………The caption reads: ‘1957 saw The Queen’s first televised Christmas message, broadcast live from the Long Library at Sandringham, Norfolk.

Speaking from Buckingham Palace, calling it a landmark day' and giving a nod to her grandfather George V for starting the festive tradition on the radio

Speaking from Buckingham Palace, calling it a landmark day’ and giving a nod to her grandfather George V for starting the festive tradition on the radio

The caption reads: '1957 saw The Queen’s first televised Christmas message, broadcast live from the Long Library at Sandringham, Norfolk.'

The caption reads: ‘1957 saw The Queen’s first televised Christmas message, broadcast live from the Long Library at Sandringham, Norfolk.’

‘The Queen’s grandfather, King George V broadcast the first Christmas message in 1932: ‘The text for King George’s speech was written by poet and writer Rudyard Kipling and included the words, “I speak now from my home and from my heart to you all.”’Gushing about the Queen, one follower noted: ‘She was so young! She sound like a baby’…………..’So incredibly regal,’ while one said: And what a true privilege it must have been to be able to see and hear Her Majesty for the first time!

Gushing about the Queen, one follower noted: 'She was so young! She sound like a baby'

Gushing about the Queen, one follower noted: ‘She was so young! She sound like a baby’

Dressed in a glitzy evening gown and the three-string pearl necklace gifted to her by her father King George when she turned 21 - a piece the monarch still wears - the Queen can be seen sitting by the piano, alongside a framed picture of Prince Charles and Princess Anne

Dressed in a glitzy evening gown and the three-string pearl necklace gifted to her by her father King George when she turned 21 – a piece the monarch still wears – the Queen can be seen sitting by the piano, alongside a framed picture of Prince Charles and Princess Anne

1952: Months after the death of her father, King George VI, a 26-year-old Queen Elizabeth took on the daunting task of delivering the Christmas speech from Sandringham, pictured

1952: Months after the death of her father, King George VI, a 26-year-old Queen Elizabeth took on the daunting task of delivering the Christmas speech from Sandringham, pictured

1998: The broadcast features framed black and white photographs of Prince William, Prince Harry, Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie in the background of the shot, pictured

1998: The broadcast features framed black and white photographs of Prince William, Prince Harry, Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie in the background of the shot, pictured

2018: Last year the Queen's message paid tribute to her son Prince Charles' 70th birthday with a black and white photograph of her with her son as a baby seen on her desk, pictured

2018: Last year the Queen’s message paid tribute to her son Prince Charles’ 70th birthday with a black and white photograph of her with her son as a baby seen on her desk, pictured

In 1952, dressed in a classic suit, the Queen took her seat behind a desk at Sandringham, Norfolk, where equipment had been set up to record her first Christmas message for radio: In her message, she paid tribute to her late father, and asked people to remember her at the time of her Coronation the following June: She also thanked the public for their support in the 10 months since her ascension to the throne.

#AceHistoryDesk reports ……….Published: Dec.10: 2019:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News here: https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts as a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews