#OnThisDay 1920: The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing American women’s right to vote, is certified in effect by Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby and also on this day …………..#AceHistoryDesk reports

On this day, Aug. 26 ……………1920: The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, guaranteeing American women’s right to vote, is certified in effect by Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby.

Also on this day:

  • 1883: The island volcano Krakatoa begins cataclysmic eruptions, leading to a massive explosion the following day.
  • 1910: Thomas Edison demonstrates for reporters an improved version of his Kinetophone, a device for showing a movie with synchronized sound.
  • 1957: The Soviet Union announces it had successfully tested an intercontinental ballistic missile.
  • 1968: The Democratic National Convention opens in Chicago; the four-day event that results in the nomination of Hubert H. Humphrey for president is marked by a bloody police crackdown on anti-war protesters in the streets.
  • 1971: New Jersey Gov. William T. Cahill announces that the New York Giants football team has agreed to leave Yankee Stadium for a new sports complex to be built in East Rutherford.
  • 1972: The summer Olympics games open in Munich, West Germany.
  • 1974: Charles Lindbergh — the first man to fly solo, non-stop across the Atlantic — dies at his home in Hawaii at age 72.
  • 1985: Ryan White, a 13-year-old AIDS patient, begins “attending” classes at Western Middle School in Kokomo, Ind., via a telephone hook-up at his home. (School officials had barred Ryan from attending classes in person.)

This family photo shows Jaycee Lee Dugard as a young girl. Dugard was kidnapped in 1991 and held captive for 18 years by a paroled sex offender.

This family photo shows Jaycee Lee Dugard as a young girl. Dugard was kidnapped in 1991 and held captive for 18 years by a paroled sex offender. (AP2009)

  • 2009: Authorities in California solve the 18-year-old disappearance of Jaycee Lee Dugard after she appears at a parole office with her children and the couple accused of kidnapping her when she was 11.

  • 2015: Alison Parker, a reporter for WDBJ-TV in Roanoke, Va., and her cameraman, Adam Ward, are shot to death during a live broadcast by a disgruntled former station employee who would fatally shoot himself while being pursued by police.
  • 2017: Boxer Floyd Mayweather Jr. beats UFC fighter Conor McGregor in a boxing match in Las Vegas that was stopped by the referee in the 10th round.

#AceHistoryDesk reports …………….FoxNews.Com/ Published: Aug.26: 2019:

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Featured Blogger Report: Fear brought rise to an icon – Smokey // Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDes k reports

One of the first Smokey Bear posters during WWII, circa 1946.
Advertising Archive/Everett

“Remember Pearl Harbor!” “Loose Lips Might Sink Ships.” Those are among the most famous slogans of World War II. But another poster child birthed during the war—Smokey Bear—might be even better remembered. The ad campaign that spawned the cartoonish bear, and a fire prevention legend, was only made possible by wartime paranoia about the possibility of a Japanese invasion of the continental United States.

At the time, many Americans worried that explosive devices might spark forest fires along the Pacific coast—for which the U.S. was hardly prepared.

WWII was a tricky time for forest fire fighting. In the face of wartime rationing, it became harder and harder to get a hold of modern firefighting equipment. As more and more male firefighters joined the war efforts, officials faced a dilemma. “Foresters feared that the forest fire problem might soon get out of hand unless the American public could be awakened to its danger,” said forestry researcher, J. Morgan Smith.

The shelling sparked a national invasion panic, with speculation as to just what Axis fighters could be capable of on U.S. soil. The specter of devastating fires loomed large. Not only were local men assisting with the war effort instead of watching for fires, but firefighting had long been considered a local concern.

Though federal funds had been going toward forest fire fighting since the early 20th century, there was no national effort to fight forest fires. State forestry services and the Forest Service joined the newly created War Advertising Council to create the Cooperative Forest Fire Prevention Program in 1942.

The program focused on public service advertising, and posters urging the public to aid the war effort by preventing forest fires were soon splashed across the country. In 1944, the program enlisted a famous poster child, Disney’s Bambi. But Disney only lent the character to the effort for a year.

Smokey, over time

Artist Albert Staehle, known for his illustrations of adorable animals, stepped into the gap. He created the first poster of a cartoonish bear pouring water on a campfire. The Forest Service named the character after a former firefighting legend, New York assistant fire chief, Smokey Joe Martin.

The injured bear cub, rescued from a forest fire in the Capitan Mountains – calender
US Forest Service/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images

The living symbol of Smokey Bear was a five-pound, three month old American black bear cub who was found in the spring of 1950 after the Capitan Gap fire, a wildfire that burned in the Capitan Mts. of New Mexico. Smokey had climbed a tree to escape the blaze, but his paws and hind legs had been burned. Local crews who had come from New Mexico and Texas to fight the blaze removed the cub from the tree.

Smokey Bear, frolicking in a pool, by Schroeder, Francine, c. 1950s, Smithsonian Archives – History Div, 92-3559.

During his 26-year tenure at the zoo, Smokey Bear became a national icon—and the words “Only YOU Can Prevent Forest Fires” a nationally known catchphrase.

Ironically, the only real enemy attempts to burn U.S. forests were failures. More than 9,000 Japanese fire balloons were launched over the western United States between 1944 and 1945, but the weapons caused few casualties and even less fire damage.

Over the next 75 years, Smokey’s message of forest fire prevention successfully raised awareness of the dangers of unattended fires—but is also thought to have turned public opinion against burns of any kind. Ironically, the bear helped put the brakes on controlled burns, which keep the amount of flammable brush under control and help encourage new growth in forests.

While Smokey’s message has since been updated to mention “wildfires” instead of “forest fires” and to support prescribed fires while still preventing “unwanted and unplanned outdoor fires,” the “Smokey Bear effect” has been blamed for making U.S. forests less resilient in the face of climate change.

From: History.com

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor from the 1942 New Yorker magazine –

“I’ll see if he’s in, sir.”

“I still can’t tell them apart.”

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Farewell Salutes –

Bruce Aikenhead – London, CAN; RC Air Force/RAF, WWII, CBI, mechanic

Thomas Barry – Clearwater, FL; US Army, WWII, ETO, Purple Heart

Edward Cole – Surprise, AZ; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, Co. B/457 Artillery/11th Airborne Division

Andrew ‘Max’ Eggman – Gridley, CA; USMC, Korea & Vietnam, GySgt. (Ret. 20 y.)

Raymond Howey – Ransom County, ND; US Army, WWII

Arthur Jacob – Webster, MA; US Army, WWII, 84th Infantry, Purple Heart

Dorothy Klar – New Orleans, LA; Civilian, Engles Shipyard, WWII, inspector

Frank Livoti – NYC, NY; US Navy, WWII

Billie Paige – Winfield, KS; US Navy, WWII, USS Shangri-la

Charles Whitten – Winter Haven, FL; US Coast Guard, WWII

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Source: // Pacific Paratrooper

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