FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: So the solution to teaching Native American culture or history (or the culture or history of any group of people for that matter, indigenous or not) is to reduce it to follow the same set of racist or bigoted parameters that caused the problem in the first place? Good grief. #AceHistoryDesk reports

It presents an interesting problem in the real world as there are a whole hell of a lot more schools and classrooms than there are Native American teachers. By the logic in that meme, most schools would be reduced to teaching little more than Scots-Irish history from the post-colonial Caucasian perspective. Surely that’s exactly what would be ideal to avoid.

But why stop there? Anthropologists shouldn’t be allowed to lecture on any culture they are not from or originally part of. I guess we can simply dismiss an epic amount of scientific literature and anthropological data that allows us to understand other cultures and subgroups. Simply because that information hasn’t come to us directly from a person who is a member of that culture, ethnicity or race.

Do you make more finite distinctions between race, ethnicity and culture/sub-culture? How far have you actually thought this out? It’s easy enough to bang together a meme and post it on Facebook or copypasta and come off as pithy. It’s quite another to actually think something through to its logical end.

How does your grand design apply to mixed race/culture kids? Would they be allowed to teach one subject (pick a parent) or both subjects based on their race/ethnicity or… neither. Why stop with race and ethnicity? Surely you could apply the same logic to class. Only people that were raised in a certain socioeconomic class would then be allowed to teach anyone else from that same socioeconomic class.

The irony is too rich, my family comes from northern New Mexico and southern Colorado and very much a part of the Na-Dené culture. Jicarilla to be exact. So frankly you’re preaching to the choir in terms of trying to break down all the injustices done. I get it. My family gets it… we’ve understood it from the very first day that the Spanish conquistador Juan de Oñate and his men set foot in North America in 1598, in particular, the Province of Santa Fe de Nuevo México.I suspect the Na-Dené people would have a good chuckle at the absurdity of the meme.

David Ison So the solution to teaching Native American culture or history (or the culture or history of any group of people for that matter, indigenous or not) is to reduce it to follow the same set of racist or bigoted parameters that caused the problem in the first place? Good grief.

It presents an interesting problem in the real world as there are a whole hell of a lot more schools and classrooms than there are Native American teachers. By the logic in that meme, most schools would be reduced to teaching little more than Scots-Irish history from the post-colonial Caucasian perspective. Surely that’s exactly what would be ideal to avoid.

But why stop there? Anthropologists shouldn’t be allowed to lecture on any culture they are not from or originally part of. I guess we can simply dismiss an epic amount of scientific literature and anthropological data that allows us to understand other cultures and subgroups. Simply because that information hasn’t come to us directly from a person who is a member of that culture, ethnicity or race.

Do you make more finite distinctions between race, ethnicity and culture/sub-culture? How far have you actually thought this out? It’s easy enough to bang together a meme and post it on Facebook or copypasta and come off as pithy. It’s quite another to actually think something through to its logical end.

How does your grand design apply to mixed race/culture kids? Would they be allowed to teach one subject (pick a parent) or both subjects based on their race/ethnicity or… neither. Why stop with race and ethnicity? Surely you could apply the same logic to class. Only people that were raised in a certain socioeconomic class would then be allowed to teach anyone else from that same socioeconomic class.

The irony is too rich, my family comes from northern New Mexico and southern Colorado and very much a part of the Na-Dené culture. Jicarilla to be exact. So frankly you’re preaching to the choir in terms of trying to break down all the injustices done. I get it. My family gets it… we’ve understood it from the very first day that the Spanish conquistador Juan de Oñate and his men set foot in North America in 1598, in particular, the Province of Santa Fe de Nuevo México.I suspect the Na-Dené people would have a good chuckle at the absurdity of the meme.

Source: mydaz.blog/2019/04/10/racist-bigoted-parameters/

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