FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: The Bomb Babysitter //Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

Donald Hornig was a year out of graduate school when he received a mysterious job offer. No one would even tell him what or even where the job was, so he declined – until the President of Harvard University called and convinced him to take it.

Donald Hornig

Soon after, Hornig bought an old car and headed for Los Alamos, New Mexico. He would become one of the youngest leaders of the team that developed the first atomic bomb and the last surviving witness of the detonation on July 16, 1945.

Albert Einstein & Julius Robert Oppenheimer

Born in Milwaukee, Hornig “was the first in his family to go to college,” said the Associated Press. He studied physical chemistry at Harvard, earning his Doctorate in 1943. In Los Alamos, the head of the Manhattan Project, J. Robert Oppenheimer, gave him the job of developing the firing unit that triggered the detonation.

The Trinity tower. “At 9 p.m., I climbed the 100-foot tower to the top, where I baby-sat the live bomb,” Dr. Hornig recalled in a 2005 NPR interview. Credit Los Alamos National Laboratory

On the eve of the blast, Hornig “was assigned another task,” said The Washington Post. Oppenheimer decided that someone should be at the site to babysit the bomb, he later remembered.

As lighting and thundered raged outside, Hornig sat by the bomb reading a book of humorous essays. In the morning, “he took his place beside Oppenheimer in a control room more than 5 miles away.”

When the bomb exploded, at 5:29:45 a.m., Hornig recalled, “My first reaction, having not slept for 48 hours, was, ‘Boy am I tired.’ My second was, We sure opened a can of worms.” He later described the massive orange fireball as, “one of the most aesthetically beautiful things I have ever seen.”

Hornig went on to teach at Brown and Princeton universities, said the New York Times, before becoming science adviser to President Lyndon Johnson. “Working for Johnson was reportedly not easy; the president disdained scientists because many of them opposed the Vietnam War.

Hornig was named president of Brown University in 1970, where his budget cuts restored the institution’s finances. Upon his resignation in 1976, he described his tenure as “bittersweet.” He returned to Harvard and to teaching to end his career.

Donald Hornig was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on 17 March 1920 and the world lost him on 21 January 2013 in Providence, Rhode Island.

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Military HALLOWEEN Humor –

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE!!

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Farewell Salutes –

Lawrence Brown – Yale, OK; US Navy, WWII & Korea, submarine service

Jesus Cepeda – Lawrenceville, GA; US Navy, WWII, Pearl Harbor

Adrian Dunt – Howard County, IA; US Army Air Corps, Japan Occupation, 11th Airborne Division

Robert Frear – Whangamata, NZ; NZEF # 76618, WWII

Robert Kost – Williamsport, PA; US Navy, WWII, boat mechanic

Maurice McCarthy – WV; US Merchant Marine, WWII, ETO / US Navy

Ethel Orr – VT & HI; US Army WAC, WWII, PTO, Operating nurse

James Slape – Morehead City, NC; US Army, Afghanistan, Sgt., KIA

Henry Suverkrup – Dubuque, IA; US Navy, WWII, USS Saratoga

Charlie Wolfers – Canon City, CO; US Army Air Corps, WWII, communications

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Source: https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2018/10/29/the-bomb-babysitter/ GP CoxOct 29

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: Today in Old West History — On today’s date 137 years ago, Wedne sday, October 26, 1881, at 3:00 PM, the most famous event in the entire history of the Old West took place a t the town of Tombstone in Arizona Territory — in a narrow lot six doors west of the rear entrance t o the O.K. Corral on Fremont Street by MyDazBlog #AceHistoryDesk reports

☞The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, which is believed to have lasted for only about thirty seconds, was fought between the outlaw Cowboys Gang members Billy Claiborne, Ike & Billy Clanton, & Tom & Frank McLaury, against a group of Lawmen comprised of Marshal Virgil Earp & his brothers Morgan & Wyatt, aided by Doc Holliday. Ike Clanton & Billy Claiborne ran from the fight unharmed, but Ike’s brother Billy Clanton was killed, along with both McLaurys. Virgil & Morgan were wounded, but Wyatt Earp & Doc Holliday came through the fight unscathed.

☞The funerals for Billy Clanton (age 19), Tom McLaury (age 28), & his older brother Frank (age 33) were well-attended. Around 300 people joined in the procession to Boot Hill, & as many as 2,000 watched from the sidewalks of Tombstone.

☞The Coroner’s Jury ruling neither condemned nor exonerated the Lawmen for shooting the Cowboys. “William Clanton, Frank, & Thomas McLaury, came to their deaths in the town of Tombstone on October 26, 1881 from the effects of gunshot wounds inflicted by Virgil, Morgan, & Wyatt Earp, & Doc Holliday.

☞It is curiously interesting to compare the famous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral to the relatively unknown Gun Battle at Buttermilk Junction. (Buttermilk Junction is the location where the tracks of the Fort Worth & New Orleans railroad & the tracks of the Missouri Pacific railroad intersected, & it is the namesake of Buttermilk Junction Old-Time String Band.)

☞The 1881 Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, with seven participants & resulting in three deaths, was a relatively obscure & almost unknown event outside of Arizona Territory at the time when it took place. The 1886 Gun Battle at Buttermilk Junction near Fort Worth was fought between striking railroad labor union members against guards hired by the railroad companies led by former Fort Worth town marshal Longhair Jim Courtright (1848-1887). This gunfight resulted in only one death, but it involved railroad companies, labor unions, local law enforcement, the Texas Rangers, & the Texas State Militia — so it was widely reported in newspapers & magazines all around the country & it soon became one of the most famous events of its day. By the 1930s, the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral had gone from relative obscurity to world-wide fame, & the once-famous Gun Battle at Buttermilk Junction had faded into obscurity & was mostly forgotten.

☞The left-hand photograph depicts the remains of the OK Corral after it was severely damaged when the town of Tombstone was devastated by fire in May 1882 — about seven months after the famous gunfight.

☞The right-hand photograph depicts (left-to-right) the bodies of Tom McLaury, Frank McLaury, & Billy Clanton in coffins in the window of the undertakers. This is the only known surviving photograph of Billy Clanton.

fb_img_15406305629001016652875.jpg?w=474

Source: https://mydaz.blog/2018/10/27/%E2%98%9Etoday-in-old-west-history-on-todays-date-137-years-ago-wednesday-october-26-1881-at-300-pm-the-most-famous-event-in-the-entire-history-of-the-old-west-took-place-at-the-town/

Aside October 27, 2018 DAZZLED

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: USS Indianapolis (CA-35) – 30 July 1945 | Pacific Paratrooper #AceHisto ryDesk reports

Sadly, four days later after delivering the components of the atomic bomb from California to the Pacific Islands in the most highly classified naval mission of the war, USS Indianapolis is sailing alone in the center of the Philippine Sea when she is struck by two torpedoes and sunk within twelve minutes.

USS Indianapolis off Mare Island, 10 July 1945

The ship was without a sufficient number of lifeboats, her disappearance went unnoticed for almost four days and the navy search team was called off early. Therefore, only 316 men of her 1,196-man crew were rescued. This has been considered the most controversial sea disaster in American history.

For the next five nights and four days, almost three hundred miles from the nearest land, the men battle injuries, sharks, dehydration, insanity, and eventually each other. Only 316 will survive. For the better part of a century, the story of USS Indianapolis has been understood as a sinking tale. The reality, however, is far more complicated—and compelling. Now, for the first time, thanks to a decade of original research and interviews with 107 survivors and eyewitnesses, Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic tell the complete story of the ship, her crew, and their final mission to save one of their own.

part of the Indianapolis crew

It begins in 1932, when Indianapolis is christened and launched as the ship of state for President Franklin Roosevelt. After Pearl Harbor, Indianapolis leads the charge to the Pacific Islands, notching an unbroken string of victories in an uncharted theater of war.

Then, under orders from President Harry Truman, the ship takes aboard a superspy and embarks on her final world-changing mission: delivering the core of the atomic bomb to the Pacific for the strike on Hiroshima.

Vincent and Vladic provide a visceral, moment-by-moment account of the disaster that unfolds days later after the Japanese torpedo attack, from the chaos on board the sinking ship to the first moments of shock as the crew plunge into the remote waters of the Philippine Sea, to the long days and nights during which terror and hunger morph into delusion and desperation, and the men must band together to survive.

Captain Charles Butler McVay III, US Navy

Then, for the first time, the authors go beyond the men’s rescue to chronicle Indianapolis’s extraordinary final mission: the survivors’ fifty-year fight for justice on behalf of their skipper, Captain Charles McVay III, who is wrongly court-martialed for the sinking.

What follows is a captivating courtroom drama that weaves through generations of American presidents, from Harry Truman to George W. Bush, and forever entwines the lives of three captains—McVay, whose life and career are never the same after the scandal; Mochitsura Hashimoto, the Japanese sub commander who sinks Indianapolis but later joins the battle to exonerate McVay; and William Toti, the captain of the modern-day submarine Indianapolis, who helps the survivors fight to vindicate their captain.

USS Indianapolis survivors on Guam, August 1945

McVay was found guilty on the charge of failing to zigzag. The court sentenced him to lose 100 numbers in his temporary rank of Captain and 100 numbers in his permanent rank of Commander, thus ruining his Navy career. In 1946, at the behest of Admiral Nimitz who had become Chief of Naval Operations, Secretary Forrestal remitted McVay’s sentence and restored him to duty. McVay served out his time in the New Orleans Naval District and retired in 1949 with the rank of Rear Admiral. He took his own life in 1968.

Read another story from us: After The USS Indianapolis Was Sunk, The Sailors Had To Survive The Worst Shark Attack in History

A sweeping saga of survival, sacrifice, justice, and love, Indianapolis stands as both groundbreaking naval history and spellbinding narrative—and brings the ship and her heroic crew back to full, vivid, unforgettable life. It is the definitive account of one of the most remarkable episodes in American history.

From: War history on-line, “In Harm’s Way” and the USS Indianapolis official website.

The wreck of the USS Indianapolis was finally found 19 August 2017.

Video: https://youtu.be/vzs8wJvbwWQ

Click on images to enlarge.

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Political Humor –

DEPENDS ON YOUR POINT OF VIEW!

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Farewell Salutes –

Thomas Buchinsky – PA; US Navy, Vietnam, USS Saratoga

Elihu ‘Al’ Channin – CT; US Air Force, Korea, pilot

David Davis – Granite City, IL; US Air Force, Korea

Clarence Gransberg – Hatton, ND; US Navy, WWII

Joseph Kennedy – Aurora, CO; US Air Force, Flight Instructor (Ret. 30 y.)

Fred Marloff – IN; US Navy, WWII, PTO

James R. Peterson – Mason City, IA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, PTO, B-24 waist gunner on “Black Jack”, 43rd/403 Bombardment Squadron

Joachim Roenneberg – NOR; Norwegian underground, WWII, demolition, Operation Gunnerside

Margaret Strautman – Montreal, CAN; RC Navy, WWII, ETO

Henry Wheeler – Buffalo, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO, 12th Army, Intelligence, Bronze Star

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Research for Jeff S. –

Doc1

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June 1945 for the NavyIn “WWII”

Intermission Story (1) – A Castaway’s War Against the JapaneseIn “Book Reviews”

USS Laffey & the American FlagIn “First-hand Accounts”

Source: https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2018/10/25/uss-indianapolis-ca-35-30-july-1945/ USS Indianapolis (CA-35) – 30 July 1945 GP Cox Oct 25

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: What would become known as – The Bomb | Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

In a 1958 interview, Truman was asked about the soul-searching decision he went through to decide on dropping the bomb. He replied, “Hell no, I made it like _ (snapped his fingers) _ that!” One year later at Columbia University, he said, “The atom bomb was no great decision.” He likened it to a larger gun.

Pres. Harry S. Truman

The components for the 20-kiloton weapon were being shipped to Tinian Island, in the Marianas, aboard the “Indianapolis.” The top-secret package arrived at its destination a mere 24 hours after the official operational order for the bomb was sent to General Carl (“Tooey”) Spaatz.

Prince Konoye, after laboring two years for a route to peace, swallowed poison and died the day before he was to turn himself in as a war criminal.

The bomb, when it arrived, was a metal cylinder approximately 18 inches in diameter and two feet high, but when fully assembled, it measured ten feet long and 28 inches in diameter. It had originally been nicknamed “Thin Man” after the movie and the expected shape, but when it was completed, they changed it to “Little Boy” and gave the small bundle its own hiding place. The secrecy involving the bomb storage area was so secure that a general was required to have a pass to enter.

509th Composite Group, WWII

The other members of the 509th Bomber Group, not included in the mission, knew something was brewing, but they also were unaware of the exact plans. Hence, an anonymous writer was inspired:

Into the air the secret rose,
Where they’re going, nobody knows.
Tomorrow they’ll return again,
But we’ll never know where they’ve been.
Don’t ask about results or such,
Unless you want to get in Dutch.
But take it from one who is sure of the score,
The 509th is winning the war.

The crew of the ‘Enola Gay’ even received a humorous menu as they entered the mess hall for breakfast:

Look! Real eggs (How do you want them?)
Rolled oats (Why?)
Milk (No fishing)
Sausage (We think it’s pork)
Apple butter (Looks like axle grease)
Butter (Yep, it’s out again)
Coffee (Saniflush)
Bread (Someone get a toaster)

509th Composite Group, reunion

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor –

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Farewell Salutes –

Peter Bundy – Edgartown, MA; US Air Force, Vietnam, Captain, C-130 pilot

Michael Clamp – UK / US; US Army

Salvador Finazzo – Brooklyn, NY; US Army, Korea / FL National Guard, Col., Medical Corps

Ray Harris – Nevada, IA; US Army Air Corps, WWII, CBI, B-29 navigator

William Krupicka – Stamford, CT; US Navy, WWII, USS Stephen Potter

Robert LeMaire – Chicago, IL; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO,B-24 navigator/gunner

Mike Mauer – Kansas City, MO; USMC, WWII, PTO / US Army, Korea

Sidney Oxenham – Toronto, CAN; RC Air Force, WWII, CBI, 436th Squadron

Joyce Senne – Rochester, NY; US Navy WAVE, WWII, ETO, 1st Lt., nurse

Jack Wattley – Cleveland, OH; US Navy, WWII, USS Moffett and Melvin

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Source: https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2018/10/22/what-would-become-known-as-the-bomb-2/ GP Cox Oct 22

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

October 19

The Adverts 250 Project

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today?

Oct 19 - 10:19:1768 Georgia GazetteGeorgia Gazette (October 19, 1768).

“A few new Negroes, will be sold on the most reasonable terms.”

The partnership of Cowper and Telfairs repeatedly inserted a list-style advertisement in the Georgia Gazette in the fall of 1768. Extending nearly half a column, the advertisement enumerated dozens of items included among the “Compleat and Large ASSORTMENT of EUROPEAN and EAST-INDIA GOODS” that Cowper and Telfairs had imported from London. Their inventory included everything from “black, buff, and crimson wove breeches” to “a large assortment of printed linens, cottons, and chintzes” to “gunpowder and shot” to “ironmongery of various kinds.” To further underscore the vast array of choices they made available to consumers, the partners indicated that all the merchandise listed in their advertisement was “exclusive of many other articles too tedious to mention.”

Running this sort of advertisement was…

View original post 395 more words

FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: Truman and the Pacific War | Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

Harry S. Truman did not have the outstanding record that most people look for in a president. He had poor eyesight and was unable to complete a 4-year college. Later, he failed as the owner/operator of a small mining and oil business, as a farmer and then as a haberdasher. (In my opinion, that only left politics as an option.)

Potsdam Conference w/ Churchill, Truman & Stalin

HST was elected to the Senate with the assistance of the corrupt Thomas J. Pendergast and proved to be an unimportant legislator. His only military achievement was in successfully tightening up the discipline of the rag-tag outfit he was given. He was chosen as the Vice-Presidential candidate because southern democrats liked him and FDR needed those votes. (I’m afraid these facts were located during research, they are not my own thoughts – unless specified.)

This was the man sent to Germany, sailing on the “Augusta” with Secretary of State, James Byrnes and Admiral Leahy to attend the Potsdam Conference to begin on 17 July 1945. The primary agenda for the massive meeting dealt with the revision of the German-Soviet-Polish borders and the expulsion of several million Germans from the disputed territories. The code name for this conference was “Terminal,” with Stalin, Churchill and Truman representing the three major powers.

16 July was significant in that the Atomic bomb was successfully tested, exploding the equivalent of 20,000 tons of TNT and a blast point of 750 degrees F. Oppenheimer would then prepare the test results for his report to Henry Stimson in Potsdam. Truman confided the news to Churchill and the two rulers instantly decided that at least two bobs would be dropped on Japan.

This decision was made despite the arguments of Adm. Leahy, General “Hap” Arnold and Gen. Dwight Eisenhower who strongly spoke against it’s use, calling it completely unnecessary. Many of the scientists that worked on the Manhattan Project felt that such a dramatic scientific discovery should not be used. The petition, “…the liberated forces of nature for the purpose of destruction … open the door to an era of devastation …,” was signed by 57 scientists. They had the foresight to visualize the nuclear problems that we face today, but their qualms went unheeded.

The Potsdam Proclamation demanded the unconditional surrender of Japan, but did not make mention of two clearly important issues – (1) that the atomic bomb was is existence and (2) whether or not the Emperor would retain his seat in the palace. Both of these provisions would have clarified the true situation for the Japanese Army. Many, on-site at Potsdam, believe that the Japanese were purposely and maliciously misguided.

26 July, the same day that Clement Attlee defeated Winston Churchill in the election for Prime Minister, the Potsdam Declaration was sent to the enemy. The exact wording of this document made it unthinkable for Japan to accept. Once again, the lack of understanding for a foreign culture would hinder the road to peace.

MGeneral Makato Onodera, in Norway, 1942

Keep in mind, while still at sea on the ‘Augusta,’ Byrnes had received a message from Sweden stating that Japanese Major Gen. Makoto Onodera, having authorization from the Emperor, wished to enter into peace negotiations. The only stipulation being that the Emperor remain in power.

By this time, Prince Konoye had spent two years laboring to uncover a route to peace. The prince had had the correct procedure all along, but mistakenly had chosen the Soviet Union as the go-between. Stalin had his own agenda in mind for the Japanese and their territories and therefore he deceitfully strung the envoys along with various delaying tactics.

Allen Dulles, OSS

OSS Allen Dulles, who assisted in negotiations when Italy fell, was working on the same premise in Switzerland. Nevertheless, as spring turned to summer, militarists in Japan continued to plan for Operation Decision (Ketsu-Go) and ignored their government’s attempts for peace. Disregarding Japan’s concern for their Emperor, the Potsdam Declaration was considered by Premier Suzuki and the military to be a re-hashing of the Cairo Declaration which deemed it to be marked as “mokusatsu” (‘ignore entirely’ or ‘regard as unworthy of notice’)

In regards to the A-bomb, Secretary of War, Stimson and his assistant, John McCloy, told Truman, “We should all have our heads examined if we don’t try to find a political solution.”

Truman laughed.

Click on images to enlarge.

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Political Sarcasm –

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Farewell Salutes –

Otis ‘Pete’ Clemons – Oceola City, FL; US Navy, WWII, PTO

Robert Dugan Sr. – Yonkers, NY; US Navy, WWII, USS Amsterdam

David Giammattalo – Toronto, CAN; Canadian Army, WWII

Edward Herod – East Chicago, IN; US Coast Guard, WWII, PTO

James I. Jubb – Eastport, MD; US Army, Korea, Cpl., KIA

Cletis L. Leatherman – Sparks, NV; US Army Air Corps, Japan Occupation, 11th Airborne Div.

Raye Montaque – Little Rock, AR; US Navy, Engineer, Program Manager of Ships

Lester Schner – Jericho, NY; US Army

Merle (Stiles) Shelton – Bakersfield, CA; Civilian, Manhattan Project (Berkeley)

Jerry Wilde – Boca Raton, FL; US Army, Korea

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Related

Truman and the Potsdam ConferenceIn “WWII”

General Douglas MacArthurIn “Korean War”

USA Home Front 1950’sIn “Home Front”

Source: Truman and the Pacific War: GP Cox Oct 18https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2018/10/18/truman-and-the-pacific-war/

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

Who was Miss Harrisson? We now know the story of the gardening pioneer denied a scholarship in 1898 for being a woman in a mans world that came to light in a box of archives held by the Royal Horticultural Society #AceHistoryDesk reports

#AceHistoryNews – Oct.16: Miss Harrison had come top in exams on the principles of horticulture – but wasn’t allowed to claim her prize of a scholarship at the RHS because she was a woman: Very little else was known about her, but within hours of the story going out on BBC Breakfast in September, viewers were sending emails and exchanging information on social media: Her family have now come forward with information that fills in the missing gaps in her life: The trail led to the Yorkshire town of Settle, where Olive, by then Mrs Edmundson, spent her final years: Her granddaughter Alison Tyas says her grandmother was a groundbreaker, a heroine – and, for her, a granny who you could rely on for everything.”I think my strongest memory really is as an eight, nine-year-old, being taken for walks in the country and being shown the names of all the flowers,” she says. “She knew all their names.” #AceHistoryDesk reports

Alison Tyas (left) and Fiona Davison (right) looking at old photosAlison Tyas (left) and Fiona Davison (right)

In Alison’s garden, overlooked by the Yorkshire hills, apples hang from neatly cordoned trees, cabbages stand proudly in the vegetable plot and pink sedums nod their heads in the breeze.

It’s clear that her grandmother’s green fingers have passed down the generations

Alison’s memories of her grandmother are of a woman who devoted her life to caring for family. But she never forgot her knowledge of plants. “It was always there, she could always make plants grow.”………………..She says she always knew about her grandmother’s success in the exam. Although Olive was denied her scholarship, she was given a medal, which she cherished all her life……………….Olive was able to train at a college that accepted women – Swanley Horticultural College – and went on to work as a professional gardener.

The medal given to Olive HarrissonThe medal confirms the correct spelling of her surname, which was unclear in the RHS archiveGroup photograph of Swanley female studentsRHS Lindley CollectionsGroup photograph of Swanley female students

Fiona Davison, head of Libraries and Archives at the RHS, visited Settle to meet Olive’s grandchildren and examine family documents……………….She says it is terrific to find out about the real person…………………..”Olive was a gardener all her life, which is really lovely to know and to know that she actually gardened professionally,” Ms Davison says………………..”So despite not getting the scholarship, Olive returned back to Swanley and went on to work for the Cadbury family as a gardener until she got married in 1904 – and then she had a family life…………..Like most women of her time, Olive gave up her career when she married William Edmundson. She devoted her time to looking after her four children and eventually moved to Settle, to be near her daughter, Ruth, and her grandchildren.

Olive Mary HarrissonRHS Lindley CollectionsOlive Mary HarrissonPresentational grey line

Olive Mary Harrisson: An unsung gardening heroine

  • 1898: Enters Swanley College of Horticulture and comes top in the RHS Principle of Horticulture Examination
  • 1899: Takes a second course at Swanley
  • 1901: Employed as a gardener by George Cadbury at Northfield Manor in Birmingham
  • 1904: Marries William Edmundson. Olive gives up her career to look after their four children
  • 1960s: Moves to Settle in Yorkshire to be closer to family

Presentational grey line

In the afternoon, Olive’s granddaughter Alison leads me through the quiet back streets of Settle to see the house where Olive first lived when she moved to the town…………….Even in her final years Olive helped with her daughter’s garden in the grounds of the Quaker Meeting House…………………….She moved into the house in the last few months of her life. The peaceful garden has lawns, flower beds and trees. A few pink crocuses at the base of a tree raise their heads to the autumn sunlight…………………….Olive’s grandson, Chris Harrisson Petrie, who was given her surname as a middle name, joins us there…………….”I suppose it’s her last garden,” he says…………………….He leads me down the steps beside the church to a memorial stone, which bears her name………………………”This is the memorial,” he says. “She died after about four years in Settle. But then she was 92. So a good life, well lived.”

You can see more details of Olive Mary Harrisson’s life in a display at RHS Garden Harlow Carr and RHS Garden Wisley.

https://t.me/SterlingPublishingPanel/313510
The mysterious Miss HarrissonBBC.Com/ By Helen Briggs Published: October.13:2018:

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

FEATURED BLOGGER REPORT: CBI – British receive POW’s / Vietnam in the picture By//Pacific Paratrooper

Japanese POWs in Malaya

“From May onwards, prisoners in a terrible state came in daily,” recorded a British gunner unit in Burma, “many of them armed with nothing more dangerous than bamboo spears, trembling with a mixture of malaria and humiliation.”

British soldiers in Burma

But if some proved ready to quit, others did not. To the end, most Japanese who lost their ships at sea deliberately evaded Allied rescuers. On the deck of HMS Saumarez, destroyer Captain Martin Power was directing rescue operations after sinking a Japanese convoy off the Nicobars, when he suddenly heard a “clang” against the ship.

Andaman and Nicobars Islands

Peering over the side, he saw a bald, heavily built Japanese man clinging to a scrambling net with one hand, while hammering the nose of a shell against the hull with the other. Power drew his pistol, leaned over and whacked the man’s head.

“I could not think of anything else to do – I spoke no Japanese. Blood streaming down his face, he looked up at me, the pistol 6 inches from his eyes, the shell in his hand… I do not know how long I hung in this ridiculous position, eyeball to eyeball with a fanatical enemy, but it seemed too long at the time. At last he dropped the shell into the sea, brought up his feet, and pushed off from the ship’s side like an Olympic swimmer, turned on his face and swam away.”

***** ***** *****

By this time of the Pacific War, the Vietnam area of Indochina was in dispute. DeGaulle demanded that the current Vichy government take a firm stand, but this was a disaster. The Japanese had staged a pre-emptive coup against the Saigon administration. Frenchmen became POW’s and their future fate would cause Anglo-American arguments. When US planes arrived from China to carry out evacuations, the French were furious that the aircraft did not bring them cigarettes.

London’s Political Warfare Executive sent a directive to Mountbatten that highlighted the political and cultural complexities of the CBI: “Keep off Russo-Japanese, Russo-Chinese and Sino-Japanese relations except for official statements. Show that a worse fate awaits Japan if her militarists force her to fight on… Continue to avoid the alleged Japanese peace feelers.”

The Dutch, French and British owners of the old Eastern empires were increasingly preoccupied with regaining their lost territories – and they were conscious that they could expect scant help from the Americans to achieve this. The British Embassy in Washington told the Foreign Office:

“If we prosecute the Eastern War with might and main, we shall be told by some people that we are really fighting for our colonial possessions the better to exploit them and that American blood is being shed to no better purpose than to help ourselves and Dutch and French to perpetrate our degenerate colonial Empires; while if we are judged not to have gone all out, that is because we are letting America fight her own war with little aid, after having her pull our chestnuts out of the European fire.”

Quotes taken from “Retribution” by Max Hastings

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor –

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Farewell Salutes –

Edward Bailey – Parma, MI; US Navy, WWII, PTO, 2nd Lt., pilot, KIA

David Cruden – Hurtsville, AUS; RA Air Force # 422443, 460 & 582nd Bomber Command Squadrons

Fred Hermes Jr. – Villas, NJ; US Coast Guard, Academy Grad., Commander (Ret.)

William A. Laux – LaCrosse, WI & Arrow Lakes, CA; US Army, WWII, ETO

John Moore – Baltimore, MD; US Navy, WWII, Captain (Ret.)

Ronald S. Richardson – Gisborne, NZ; RNZ Air Force, WWII, ETO, Lt. Commander, pilot, KIA

Robert Stoner – Buffalo, NY; US Navy, minesweeper

Harry Thomas – Marlington, WV; US Army, WWII

Michael C. Ukaj – Johnstown, NY; USMC, Iraq (the NY limo crash on his 34th birthday)

Elwood Wells – Epsom, NH; US Army Air Corps, WWII, CBI, Captain, 1337 A.F. Base, KIA

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Source: https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2018/10/15/cbi-british-receive-pows-vietnam-in-the-picture/ CBI – British receive POW’s / Vietnam in the picture GP Cox

Oct 15

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

FEATURED BLOGGER POST: CBI Theater – 1945 By //Pacific Paratrooper #AceHistoryDesk reports

ALONG THE STILWELL ROAD – The latest man-bites-dog incident turns out to be a fish story: S/Sgt. Charles T. Hardin, Trenton, Tenn., power shovel operator for an Engineering Battalion along the Stilwell Road, used the world’s largest fishing tackle to bring in a 100-pound catfish out of the Dihing River.

Stilwell Road

Fish Story along the Stillwell Road

Hardin, an engineer, was scooping up gravel from the river’s bed, as it had been his custom to do over many months since he has been in ol’ I-BT. He noticed a massive, torpedo-like form wending its way up to the spot where his shovel was operating.

Charles T. Hardin

Giving the controls a quick one-two, Hardin hit the lumbering fish with the big bucket and stunned him into insensibility. Then, skillfully maneuvering the huge snorting shovel, he hauled him in as easily as dipping for a trout.

His piscatorial prize turned out to be a white bellied catfish, measuring almost six feet from tail to teeth. As Hardin put it, “I’ve scooped up a lot of gravel to help build this road, but I never caught anything bigger than a minnow before. This time I hit the jackpot.”

After the fish was hauled off to the company area, the boys began slicing off steaks for a fish fry was contemplated.
A real tribute was paid the Stilwell Road Isaac Walton by one of his buddies, who remarked, “Old Hardin can throw that bucket anywhere he wants!”

Poem from CBI WWII

THE DEVIL’S DILEMMAI met the Devil yesterday beneath a shady tree;
His head within his hand was held, his elbow on his knee.
A frown he wore upon his brow; his horns were dull with dust,
And resting on his arm I saw his pitchfork red with rust.
“Well, ” I said, “what can it be that brings you up from Hell?
From all appearances it seems that things aren’t going well.”
He gazed at me with blood-shot eyes and bade me take a seat,
And so I sat and wondered why his face bore sad defeat.
“O, Mortal, know,” he spoke, “that once I ruled a proud domain;Within the bowels of Earth I reigned o’er punishment and pains of those were sent to me who’d lived in sin and hate,

To suffer for eternity upon hot Hades grate.
My tortures were most terrible, no others could compare,
I though I had the latest thing in fire and brimstone there
But then came war upon the Earth with tanks and planes and guns,
And implements of war ne’er seen before beneath the sun.
Now all the souls that go below who’ve failed the living test,
No longer fear my kingdom, but go as if to rest!
But I must leave; I’ve dallied long and must be on my way.
I’m off to meet St. Peter and you’ll pardon me, I pray;
I have a plan we must discuss that may unscramble this,
For Earth’s no longer what it was; it’s Hell, that’s what it is.”

– BY S/SGT. G. W. HICKOX

Click on images to enlarge.

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Military Humor –

“Okay, now we need to go to Plan B.”

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Farewell Salutes –

Howard Anglin – AR; US Army Air Corps, WWII, CBI, P-61’s 426 Night Fighter Squadron

John Bushfield – Boise, ID; US Army, WWII, 10th Mountain Division

Smoke Angel

Virgil DeVine – St. Louis, MO; US Army Air Corps, WWII, ETO, B-26 tail gunner

Charles Goodwin – Haskell, TX; US Navy, Vietnam, pilot, USS Coral Sea, KIA

Charles Hayden – Vancouver, CA; RC Air Force, WWII, B-17 tail gunner

Jay Kislak – Hoboken, NJ; US Navy, WWII, pilot

Anna Newman – Sarasota, FL; Civilian, WWII, truck driver, MacDill Air Force Base

Albert Rivoire – Pawling, NY; US Army, WWII, ETO, 104th Infantry Division, Bronze Star

Robert Seeber – Omaha, NE; US Navy, WWII, PTO, radioman, USS Isley

Geoffrey Wright – Orewa, NZ; British Army # 14418502, WWII, ETO & CBI, Captain

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Source: CBI Theater – 1945 https://pacificparatrooper.wordpress.com/2018/10/08/cbi-theater-1945/ GP Cox

Oct 8

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring

In 1775 a scientist named Carl Wilhelm Scheele discovered a new way to make fabrics and paper green using a chemical called copper arsenite, it revolutionised style, dresses could be made with fabric that was a brilliant emerald green, instead of the sort of overstrained asparagus green that fabric was limited to before but it poisoned and killed people #AceHistoryDesk reports

#AceHistoryNews – Oct.06: Wall paper was another big time benefactor of this green dye, and it offered the ability to have beautiful flower patterns and other green designs. If you liked green, this was a great time to be alive. Until it wasn’t. Turns out that this green dye had large amounts of arsenic in it, and soon enough people were not just falling ill from it, they were dying over it #AceHistoryDesk reports

https://t.me/HistoricalPics/9346: When kids got sick from it, parents did what we parents still do, they put the kids to bed in their rooms, bedrooms that were covered in the same green wallpaper that made the kids sick in the first place: In too many cases this proved deadly. One of which was the Limehouse case from London, where four siblings all perished without any signs of other diseases, the only connecting factor being their freshly wallpapered bedrooms. Women wearing green fabric gloves were found to have lesions and sores form on their hands, a terrible reaction to their sweaty skin making direct prolonged contact with the dye.

In 1861 a 19 year old woman, named Matilda Scheurer, who worked at the fabric factory and became so poisoned by it that her eyes took on a green tint: So did her skin, her vomit, and on her deathbed she told her loved ones that everything she looked at had a green hue to it. When Napoleon went into exile in Saint Helena, the walls to his bedroom were painted his favorite bright green color. When he died of stomach cancer (something now known to be caused by arsenic), high levels of the chemical arsenic were found in his hair.

By the 1870s people had finally caught on that their decorations and clothing were to blame for the ailments and deaths they experienced, it wasn’t until 1896 that the green pigment containing arsenic stopped being used by manufacturers: #horrifichistory #horrifichistorygeek #AceHistoryNews

Editor says #AceNewsDesk reports & #Brittius says are provided by Sterling Publishing & Media News and all our posts, links can be found at here Live Feeds https://acenewsroom.wordpress.com/ Ace News Services Posts https://t.me/AceSocialNews_Bot and thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet and free help and guidance tips on your PC software or need help & guidance from our experts AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our breaking news posts on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com or become a member on Telegram https://t.me/acebreakingnews all private chat messaging on here https://t.me/sharingandcaring