VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. – A commemoration ceremony will be held June 2 in remembrance of the 74th annive rsary of the Battle of Midway – @AceHistoryNews

#AceHistoryNews – May.30: Naval Air Force Atlantic to commemorate 74th anniversary of the Battle of Midway on June 2

The ceremony will be held at 10 a.m. at the Navy Aviation Memorial Monument at 25th and Atlantic in Virginia Beach.

(Courtesy: VBPublicArt.org)

Navy Aviation Memorial Monument (Courtesy: VBPublicArt.org)

The guest speaker will be noted World War II historian Laura Orr, Deputy Education Director of the Hampton Roads Naval Museum in Norfolk. She is presently writing a book about World War II dive bomber pilot Captain Jack “Dusty” Kleiss, the last living member of the USS Enterprise’s (CV-6) Scouting Squadron 6. She will speak about the Battle of Midway through his eyes.

The ceremony will also feature Sailors from NAS Oceana laying a commemorative wreath followed by a bugler playing Taps.

The event will also feature a fly over by two F/A-18E “Super Hornet” aircraft from Strike Fighter Squadron 81 (VFA 81), the “Sunliners”, followed by a solo fly over of a World War II vintage T-6 Texan.

The Battle of Midway celebrates our warfighting heritage and commemorates the momentous U.S. Navy victory of the World War II battle which changed the tide of the war in the Pacific and the course of world history.

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The Spanish conquest of Petén was the last stage of the conquest of Guatemala, a prolonged conflict dur ing the Spanish colonisation of the Americas – @AceHistoryNews

.The Itza, the Yalain, the Kowoj, and other Maya populations in Petén were engaged in a complex web of alliances and enmities before the conquest. Petén was first penetrated by Hernán Cortés with a sizeable expedition that crossed the territory from north to south in 1525.

In the first half of the 16th century Spain established neighbouring colonies in Yucatán to the north and Guatemala to the south.

In 1622 a military expedition from Yucatán led by Captain Francisco de Mirones was massacred by the Itza.

In 1628 the Manche Ch’ol of the south were placed under the administration of the colonial governor of Verapaz within the Captaincy General of Guatemala.

In 1695 another expedition tried to reach Lake Petén Itzá from Guatemala. Martín de Ursúa y Arizmendi captured Nojpetén, the island capital of the Itza kingdom, in 1697, defeating the last of the independent native kingdoms in the Americas and incorporating them into the Spanish Empire.

Editors Notes:

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CAIRO: A 3,800 year-old mummy of a high class Egyptian woman has been unearthed on the west bank of the Nile River near Aswan, the antiquities ministry announced in a statement Tuesday – @AceHistoryNews

#AceHistoryNews – May.27: 3,800 year-old mummy of high class Egyptian woman unearthed in Aswan

“The mummy of a woman named “Sattjeni” was found wrapped in linen bandages lying inside two coffins made of cedar that were brought from Lebanon,” said Mahmoud Afifi, head of Ancient Egypt Antiquities Department at the Antiquities Ministry.

The finds were unveiled during excavation work carried out by the archaeological mission of Spain’s Jaén University at the Tombs of the Nobles, better known as Qubbet el-Hawa (The Dome of the Wind) archaeological site located on the west bank of modern Aswan, said Afifi.

Photo courtesy of Ministry of Antiquities Facebook page

Photo courtesy of Ministry of Antiquities
Facebook page

Photo courtesy of Ministry of Antiquities Facebook page

Photo courtesy of Ministry of Antiquities
Facebook page

Photo courtesy of Ministry of Antiquities Facebook page

Photo courtesy of Ministry of Antiquities
Facebook page

“The new discovery is significant as it sheds light on the death of the mother of Heqa-ib III and Amaeny-Seneb; two prominent rulers of the nom of Aswan, (better known as Elephantine) during the reign of the 12th Dynasty Pharaohs Amenemhat III (1800 B.C. – 1775 B.C.),” he added.

Alejandro Jimenez Serrano, head of the archaeology mission, explained that the discovery of Sattjeni tomb “allows us to reconstruct the genealogy and history of the rulers of Elephantine during the late 12th Dynasty.

“Sattjeni was the daughter of Elephantine nomarch Sarenput II and after the death of all the male members of her family she was the unique holder of the dynastic rights in the government of Elephantine,” said Serrano.

The tomb was essentially the resting place of the family who ruled Elephantine between the end of the reign of Senwosret III and the reign of Amenemhat III, during which at least ten individuals were buried in this funerary complex, said Serrano.

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Suzanne Lenglen: A century ago the game of tennis changed forever by a female tennis player who broke down barriers

#AceHistoryNews – May.24: Female tennis player who broke down barriers

download

A century ago the game of tennis changed forever.

The sport used to be rigid in format, sticking to rules for the sake of tradition. Men would wear long sleeves and trousers while women could only wear long dresses.

Parisian Suzanne Lenglen changed all that. The French player, who originally started playing the sport in 1910 due to suffering asthma as a child, shrugged off the fusual look to wear a shorter, tighter outfit, full make-up and would arrive wearing a mink coat.

Not only that but she was known for drinking brandy during change overs.

After dazzling the tennis elite with her skill as a teenager, Lenglen first entered the French Open at Roland Garros aged just 14 (just four years after starting the sport) – and nearly won, missing out on the title narrowly.

Just a few months later, aged 15, she finally won her first title..

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‘Osiris, Egypt’s Sunken Mysteries’ exhibit to open at British Museum: The ruins of the two cities were discovered in 1999 by Franck Goddio; a French marine archaeologist, who heads the Eu ropean Institute – @AceHistoryNews

#AceHistoryNews – May.24 ‘Osiris, Egypt’s Sunken Mysteries’ exhibit to open at British Museum

Antiquities Minister Khaled Al Anany arrived in London Tuesday to attend the inauguration of an exhibition titled “Osiris, Egypt’s Sunken Mysteries,” scheduled for Thursday at the British Museum for an extended run of six months.

Objects being installed in the ‘Osiris, Egypt’s Sunken Mysteries’ exhibit at British Museum in London.

Objects being installed in the ‘Osiris, Egypt’s Sunken Mysteries’ exhibit at British Museum in London.

The exhibit, which comprises of 293 carefully selected artifacts excavated in the ruins of ancient Alexandria’s legendary cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus, was inaugurated early September at the Arab World Institute in Paris. The exhibit is scheduled to tour Switzerland in November before returning to Egypt.

Objects being installed in the ‘Osiris, Egypt’s Sunken Mysteries’ exhibit at British Museum in London

Objects being installed in the ‘Osiris, Egypt’s Sunken Mysteries’ exhibit at British Museum in London

The exhibit, which aims to boost Egypt’s ailing tourism sector, also features 40 objects “some of which have never been on public display before, collected from museums across the country, including the Egyptian Museum, Alexandria’s Greco-Roman and National museums along with the Bibliotheca Alexandrina Museum,” Chairman of the Central Administration of the Sunken Artifacts Mohammad Mostafa was quoted by Youm7 back in September.

Installation of a red granite stele of Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II. 2nd century BC, Thonis-Heracleion. Maritime Museum, Alexandria. British Museum Facebook page.

Installation of a red granite stele of Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II. 2nd century BC, Thonis-Heracleion. Maritime Museum, Alexandria. British Museum Facebook page.

All the artifacts illustrate the legend of the God Osiris; ancient Egypt’s afterlife deity, said Mostafa.

“The ancient Mediterranean cities of Thonis-Heracleion and Canopus sank in the late seventh/early eighth century after they were hit by an earthquake and tidal waves,” former head of the Supreme Council of Antiquities Abdel Halem Nour el-Din previously told The Cairo Post.

The ruins of the two cities were discovered in 1999 by Franck Goddio; a French marine archaeologist, who heads the European Institute for Underwater Archaeology (EIUA,) Nour el-Din said.

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

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Thanks for following as always appreciate every like, mention , reblog or #tweet also our newspaper is added with all our posts daily:

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SNIPPETS OF HISTORY: MONTANA: Novice fossil collector’s decade-old find has been announced as a new kind of spectacularly horned dinosaur related to the Triceratops – @AceHistoryNews

#AceHistoryNews – May.20: Hey, Jude: Montana welcomes new dinosaur ‘Judith’ found by amateur

A novice fossil collector’s decade-old find has been announced as a new kind of spectacularly horned dinosaur related to the Triceratops

A novice fossil collector’s lucky find in a remote Montana badlands more than a decade ago represents a new kind of spectacularly horned dinosaur, researchers announced Wednesday.

The bones unearthed near Winifred, Montana represent a previously unknown species of dinosaur that lived 76 million years ago.

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

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FEATURED: MIDDLE EAST: The signing of the Sykes-Picot agreement 100 years ago is marked with regret and bitterness by Arab columnists and social media users and some still see the same conspiracy that led to deal at work today – @AceHistoryNews

#AceHistoryNews – May.16: Sykes-Picot marked with bitterness and regret by Arab media_71651783_mpk_1_426_8_may_1916.jpgThe signing of the Sykes-Picot agreement 100 years ago is marked with bitterness and regret by Arab columnists and social media users.

The signing of the Sykes-Picot agreement 100 years ago is marked with regret and bitterness by Arab columnists and social media users.

Some commentators believe that the “same type of conspiracy” that led to the deal is still at work today.

The Sykes-Picot agreement secretly carved an area stretching from Persia to the Mediterranean into British and French spheres of influence.

Egypt’s official Al-Ahram newspaper bemoans the anniversary of the “ominous” deal as something which “divided the Arab nation“.

Ayman Al-Hammad comments in the Saudi newspaper Al-Riyadh that the anniversary “reminds Arabs that they were not liable to decide their fate“.

But Twitter user @muhydinlazikani says: “The old hag Sykes-Picot turns 100. The strangest thing in its history is that all who attacked it fiercely defended the borders she drew.”

Twitter user @Rafiknasrallah says: “As we commemorate Sykes-Picot, and after 100 years many of us still think like cattle and will not realise what has happened, and what is not happening.”

Catastrophic division

And Ibrahim al-Hamdi, writing in the London Saudi-owned daily Al-Hayat, still suspects a conspiracy: “When Briton Mark Sykes and Frenchman Francois-Georges Picot drew their map in Arab sand on the sick body of the Ottoman Empire in 1916, they did not know that 100 years later London and Paris would be begging Washington and Moscow to let them have a role in redrawing borders on their map, and that the sun would shine on two new empires.”

Twitter user @Pencil192 also suspects a conspiracy: “There is a new Sykes-Picot planned for Arabs, using the argument that dividing them along sectarian and national lines will protect them from infighting and conflicts that are in reality staged by the West and Zionists.

Ace Related News

Sykes–Picot Agreement – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sykes%E2%80%93Picot_Agreement

Editors Notes:

I would remind you that this blog is produced free for the public good and you are welcome to republish or re-use this article or any other material freely anywhere without requesting further permission.

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FEATURED: Edmond Geffroy’s Molière

Edmond Geffroy’s Molière
// Micheline’s Blog Monsieur Loyal, Tartuffe by Edmond Geffroy

Monsieur Loyal, Le Tartuffe by Edmond Geffroy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Allow me a short post.

Edmond Geffroy‘s FR was an actor and a sociétaire, one of the shareholders, of the Comédie-Française. But he was also an artist and the painting above is a watercolour portrait of an actor who played the role of Monsieur Loyal, the bailiff in Molière’s Tartuffe. I believe it has been auctioned off by Drouot.com, in Paris.

If we look at other paintings of Molière’s characters, a few appear to be by Edmond Geoffroy. They are signed, but the signature is difficult to read. However, the ‘G’ in the portrait of Monsieur Loyal resembles the ‘G’ of other portraits of Molière’s characters: the portrait of Tartuffes (1664), that of Alceste, the protagonist in Molière The Misanthrope (1666), Monsieur Jourdain, the Bourgeois gentilhomme (1670), and other characters inhabiting Molière’s theatrical world.

Alceste, Le Misanthrope Alceste, Le Misanthrope

Les Fourberies de Scapin Les Fourberies de Scapin

Gros-René, a type Gros-René, a type

Monsieur Jourdain, Le Bourgeois gentilhomme Monsieur Jourdain, Le Bourgeois gentilhomme


About Edmond Geffroy

Edmond Geffroy (1804 – 1895) entered his career at the Comédie-Française in 1829. He married Eulalie Dupuis, whose mother, Rose Dupuis, was a sociétaire de la Comédie-Française, or a shareholder.

Geoffroy was a successful actor who was named the 254th shareholder of the Comédie-Française in 1835. He was Dean of the shareholders between 1862 and 1865. He retired as as sociétaire in 1865. Edmond Geffroy created the role of Chatterton, Alfred de Vigny‘s Romantic hero, with Marie Dorval as Kitty Bell.

1311308-Alfred_de_Vigny_Chatterton

Scène de Chatterton, Lithographie de Jacques Arago (Photo credit: Larousse)*

*Larousse

As an artist, he was trained at Amaury-Duval‘s atelier. He showed paintings at the Salon the Paris from 1829 until 1863 and, in 1841, he was awarded two medals: a second-place and a third-place medal.

Some of his portraits depict groups. But between 1851 and 1863, he made portraits of his colleagues, individual actors mainly, wearing either civilian clothes or the costume they had worn performing their favourite role. Eight of his paintings hang in the foyer of the Comédie-Française.

Edmond Geffroy also executed history paintings and depictions of religious scenes.

After his death, a retrospective exhibition of is art took place in at Maignelet, his birthplace, and Beauvais. In 1995, a catalogue of his paintings was compiled by the Musée départemental de l’Oise.

I will now finish a post on Tartuffe.

Love to everyone ♥

Edmond_Geffroy

Edmond Geffroy (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

© Micheline Walker
10 May 2016
WordPress

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FEATURED: Molière’s Enigmatic Comedies

Molière’s Enigmatic Comedies
// Micheline’s Blog

300px-TheatreMoliereO9

Problematical Comedies

  • Tartuffe
  • Dom Juan
  • Le Misanthrope

Molière wrote several enigmatic comedies, but Tartuffe, Dom Juan and Le Misanthrope are the better known. All three feature masks and all three present daring and, occasionally, incongruous juxtapositions.

Tartuffe is our first case. Tartuffe feigns devotions to ruin a recoverable father, Orgon, and his family. In Reynard the Fox, Reynard escapes a death sentence by claiming he has converted and will go to the Crusades. False devotion is not a new mask. However, given Jansenism, Casuistry and Protestantism, 17th-century France was put to a test that imperiled Molière’s portrayal of feigned devotion on the part of Tartuffe, who is also a casuiste. Tartuffe was first performed in the summer of 1664 during Les Plaisirs de l’Isle enchantée, multi-day festivities held at the newly built Versailles. The play was banned by Louis XIV and Molière had to revise his comedy twice, in 1667 and in 1669, before it was considered as acceptable.

Our second play is Molière’s Dom Juan, which premièred the following year, on 15 February 1665. Dom Juan’s valet Sganarelle describes his master as a “grand seigneur méchant homme,” (“a great lord but a bad man”) and “un épouseur à toutes mains,” (“one who’ll marry anyone”) (I, 1). Given his rank, it seems unfitting on the part of Dom Juan to stoop to infidelities with peasant girls. Molière’s Dom Juan does not seduce Charlotte and Mathurine, but he has left his home and his wife, Done Elvire, and there was already a Dom Juan of legend who lingered in the mind of spectators.

Most importantly, however, Dom Juan was calling for the wrath of God by trivializing unacceptable behaviour. Molière’s Dom Juan would therefore suffer the fate awaiting the trompeur of all farces. The plot of farces is that of the “deceiver deceived,” or “trompeur trompé,” and, in Dom Juan’s case, the trompé, is heaven itself. Consequently, although Molière’s Dom Juan is less of a seducer than an audience might expect, he will be engulfed into the earth. A “machine,” a theatrical device, is used and he is led to perdition by the hand of the dead-yet-alive stone guest, the commandeur he has killed.

Dom Juan’s father reminds his son that “noblesse oblige.” In other words, there is incongruity in Dom Juan’s behaviour and although he is a “grand seigneur,” it was arrogant on his part to ignore the commandments of a greater lord, our Lord.

Our third case is The Misanthrope (4 June 1666). In a letter to d’Alembert[1], on theatre, Lettre à Monsieur d’Alembert sur les spectacles (1758), Jean-Jacques Rousseau (28 June 1712 – 2 July 1778), who was an admirer of Molière, criticized the Misanthrope (4 June 1666) because Molière had ridiculed Alceste, a good man. In Rousseau’s opinion, “l’homme de bien” should not be subjected to ridicule. Doing so is discourteous and such a juxtaposition is incongruous.

Where Alceste is concerned, gallantry is a factor, the beau monde, no sooner does the curtain lift than Alceste pounce on gallants. He tells Philinte, the raisonneur, that “he hates

  1. … nothing so much as the bowing and scraping
  2. of those great makers of protestations,
  3. those affable givers of trumpery kissers,
  4. those obliging praters of empty words,
  5. who strive to outdo each other with civilities,
  6. and treat an honest man and a scoundrel with the same air and manner.”

The Misanthrope, Internet Archive
(see also the The Misanthrope, Wikisource)

  • Et je ne hais rien tant, que les contorsions (1)
  • De tous ces grands faiseurs de protestations, (2)
  • Ces affables donneurs d’embrassades frivoles, (3)
  • Ces obligeants diseurs d’inutiles paroles, (4)
  • Qui de civilités, avec tous, font combat, (5)
  • Et traitent du même air, l’honnête homme, et le fat.” (6)

Le Misanthrope, I, 1, v. 43-48
(Molière 21)

It is difficult not to agree with the six lines quoted above. Alceste’s criticism of the society he lives in is accurate. However, it is conditioned by the sixth line. In a world where everybody praises everybody, good persons and scoundrels, “l’honnête homme et le fat,” how can he, Alceste, believe those who praise him and whose praise he needs?

No one needs to explore Alceste’s hatred of humanity. Let him continue speaking down to the sixth line at which point he will disgrace himself irredeemably.

But what advantage is it to you if a man courts you,
swears friendship, faith, zeal, honor, tenderness,
makes you some fulsome compliment,
and than turn round to the first rascal he meets, and does the same.”
(I, 1)

The Misanthrope, Internet Archive
(also see The Misanthrope, Wikisource)

  • “Quel avantage a-t-on qu’un homme vous caresse,
  • Vous jure amitié, foi, zèle, estime, tendresse,
  • Et vous fasse de vous un éloge éclatant,
  • Lorsqu’au premier faquin il court en faire autant ?” (I, 1)

We are in Célimène’s home, the young widow with whom Alceste has fallen in love and who loves Alceste. But the individuals he despises, threatening to find a refuge in one of the many “deserts” of French 17th-century literature, are the very people Célimène entertains by depicting their faults gracefully: “Les rieurs sont pour vous, Madame…” (“The laughers are on your side Madam…”) Yet, Célimène’s “portraits” match Alceste’s depictions of others. She makes fun of the very people Alceste criticizes. In other words, they are the opposite sides of the very same coin.

Alceste and Célimène differ however in that Célimène can survive at court. She is twenty, pretty and witty. He’s older, he growls, and he demands frankness not on moral grounds, but because he wishes to be certain that compliments addressed to him are true. Alceste is not a misanthrope; he is vain and insecure.

Ironically, a little gallantry would benefit Alceste, both morally and esthetically. No, as Philinte exclaims, one does not tell a woman that she is too old to wear the makeup she chooses. And would that Alceste had not criticized Oronte’s poem (I, 2) but simply changed the subject while escorting Oronte to the door.

Alceste does combine, in one character, not only “l’homme de bien” (the good man) and “le personnage ridicule,” (the ridiculous character) but also the young lover of comedy, le blondin, barely out of boyhood but whose marriage is awaited, and the barbon, the bearded older man, who opposes his wishes. Alceste combines two functions, a most incongruous juxtaposition.

Célimène doesn’t feel she can follow Alceste into a “desert,” not at the age of twenty, but she will marry him. He insists on taking her to a “desert” and rejects her:

  • Non ; mon cœur à présent vous déteste,
  • Et ce refus lui seul fait plus que tout le reste. ” (V, scène dernière)

No; my heart detests you now.
This one rebuff does more than all the rest.
(V, last scene)

(see Wikisource, The Misanthrope)

220px-Tartuffe

Tartuffe

241

Monsieur Loyal, Tartuffe

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Comedy: all’s well that ends well

  • Dom Juan
  • Tartuffe
  • the use of a deus ex machina
  • Le Misanthrope

The above-mentioned plays may seem and are problematical, but Molière is writing comedies. In comedies, the Shakespearean “all’s well that ends well” prevails. God punishes Dom Juan. As for Tartuffe, a prince who hates fraudulent activities, “un prince ennemi de la fraude,” sees that Tartuffe is in the process of defrauding Orgon and strikes. Monsieur Loyal, pictured above, is about to take Orgon’s belongings away, when an “Exempt” arrives and arrests the faux dévot.

But it’s a close call, too close a call. A comedy ends well, but a prince, a “deus ex machina,” should not have to intervene so that Orgon’s family is freed of its faux dévot. Nor should Molière have to use une machine. Dom Juan is led to eternal perdition by the dead-yet-alive commandeur whom he killed. Such remedies are too drastic. A guilty finger is pointed at society and, in Tartuffe’s case, Orgon empowered Tartuffe.

In the Misanthrope, no machine is required. Alceste is precisely as Célimène describes him in the portrait scene (II, 4): “il prend contre lui-même assez souvent les armes” (“He often takes up arms against himself[.]”)

(see Wikisource, The Misanthrope)

Conclusion

In an insightful analysis of Dom Juan and The Misanthrope, Professor Jules Brody[2] described, as follows, the problematic of both plays. In Dom Juan and the Misanthrope, we witness the victory of the esthetically right, Célimène makes people laugh by mocking them in her portraits, which is esthetically right but morally wrong. As for Dom Juan, he is un grand seigneur.

I will simply add that, in Dom Juan and Le Misanthrope, Molière pushes comedy as a genre to its very limits. In the Misanthrope, by virtue of its structure, le blondin (the young lover) is le barbon (the blocking character), or the eirôn is the alazṓn (Greek comedy).[3] In The Misanthrope, Molière may have replaced the forgiving “All’s well that ends well” by comedy’s other schéma: the farcical deceiver deceived.

As you may know, I am attempting to write a book on Molière. Hence the delays. I have just shared a few thoughts.

Love to everyone.

RELATED ARTICLES

Sources and Resources

The Misanthrope is an Internet Archive publication
The Misanthrope is a Wikisource publication, translated by Curtis Hidden Page
http://fresques.ina.fr/jalons/fiche-media/InaEdu05426/le-misanthrope-de-moliere.html (the portrait scene II, 4, video) FR

_________________________

[1] Jean Le Rond d’Alembert and Denis Diderot were the co-founders of l‘Encyclopédie.

[2] Jules Brody, “Don Juan” and “Le Misanthrope,” or The Esthetics of Individualism in Molière,” PMLA, 84 (May 1969), p. 559 – 575.

[3] Micheline Bourbeau-Walker, “Le Misanthrope, ou la comédie éclatée,” in ed. David Trott & Nicole Boursier. L’Âge du Théâtre en France /The Age of Theater in France (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada: Academic Printing and Publishing, 1988), p. 53 – 61.

Handel‘s Sarabande
« Concerts royaux, Quatrième concert: Sarabanda »
Armonie Symphony Orchestra, Stefano Seghedoni

12773-004-FB78D609

Pierrot (Gilles) by Watteau (Photo credit: Google images)

© Micheline Walker
6 May 2016
WordPress

Editors Notes:

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SNIPPETS OF HISTORY NEWS: Defense Ministry has declassified a set of historic photos made at the legendary rocket firing range of Kapustin Yar, where all initial Soviet ballistic missiles were tested – @AceNewsServices

#AceHistoryNews – May.15: 1st Soviet ballistic missiles & heroic space dogs in declassified Kapustin Yar range PHOTOS
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Russia’s Defense Ministry has declassified a set of historic photos made at the legendary rocket firing range of Kapustin Yar, where all initial Soviet ballistic missiles were tested, reaching near space with the first canine cosmonauts on board.

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