FEATURED: Poor Immigrant Makes Good

#AceHistoryNews – April.16: This is my friends Anne’s great post ..@AceHistoryNews

‪#‎HappyBirthday‬ to Anne Sullivan Macy born ‪#‎OnThisDay‬ in 1866. Macy was the eldest daughter of poor, unskilled Irish immigrants. When she was 7 years old, Macy developed trachoma, a bacterial infection of the eyes, which was left untreated.

At age 10, she was sent to the Tewksbury Almshouse, an institution for the poor. In 1880, Macy was sent to the Perkins School for the Blind. It was not until Macy was 15 years old, and almost completely blind, that she had an operation to restore some of her sight.

While at Perkins, Macy learned to read and write and the manual alphabet used by the deaf. Graduating valedictorian of her class in 1886, Macy found a job working for the Keller family whose 6 year old daughter, Helen, was deaf and blind. When Macy started working with Helen she would sign words into Helen’s hand, trying to help her understand the idea that everything has a name.

Anne took what she learned at Perkins and adapted it to produce a more natural way of teaching. Macy’s work with Keller helped establish education for children who were blind, deaf-blind, or visually impaired that is still used today. (Photo Credit: Perkins School for the Blind Archives)‪#‎womenshistory‬

Original Article: https://talesalongtheway.com/2016/04/14/poor-immigrant-makes-good/

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