‘ Money defined as a Currency as Payment for Good derived from the word Fiat originating from Yuan Dynasty ‘ ‘

#AceHistoryNews – Sept.12: Money is any object or verifiable record that is generally accepted as payment for goods and services and repayment of debts in a particular country or socio-economic context.
English: Yuan dynasty banknote with its printing wood plate 1287. An upper line reads: 「至元通行寳鈔」 zhì yuán tōng háng bǎo chāo (Pinyin). A left line ('Phagspa script) reads: jˇi ’ŭen baw č‘aw : to say 「至元寳鈔」. The smaller Chinese characters in the bottom half of the note say "(this note) can be circulated in various provinces without expiration dates. Counterfeiters would be put to death.

English: Yuan dynasty banknote with its printing wood plate 1287. An upper line reads: 「至元通行寳鈔」 zhì yuán tōng háng bǎo chāo (Pinyin). A left line (‘Phagspa script) reads: jˇi ’ŭen baw č‘aw : to say 「至元寳鈔」. The smaller Chinese characters in the bottom half of the note say “(this note) can be circulated in various provinces without end dates. Counterfeiters would be put to death.

The main functions of money are distinguished as: a medium of exchange; a unit of account; a store of value; and, occasionally in the past, a standard of deferred payment.

Any kind of object or verifiable record that fulfils these functions can be considered money.

Money is historically an emergent market phenomenon establishing a commodity money, but nearly all contemporary money systems are based on fiat money.

Fiat money, like any check or note of debt, is without intrinsic use value as a physical commodity. It derives its value by being declared by a government to be legal tender; that is, it must be accepted as a form of payment within the boundaries of the country, for “all debts, public and private”. Such laws in practice cause fiat money to acquire the value of any of the goods and services that it may be traded for within the nation that issues it.
Fiat money is currency which derives its value from government regulation or law. The term derives from the Latin fiat (“let it be done”, “it shall be”). It differs from commodity money and representative money. Commodity money is created from a good, often a precious metal such as gold or silver, which has uses other than as a medium of exchange (such a good is called a commodity), while representative money simply represents a claim on such a good.

The first use of fiat money was recorded in China around 1000 AD. Since then, it has been used continuously by various countries, concurrently with commodity currencies.

The text reads: 除四川外許於諸路州縣公私從便主管並同見錢七百七十陌流轉行使, which essentially means that except in w:Sichuan, the bill may be used in the stead of 77,000 wen of metal coinage.

The text reads: 除四川外許於諸路州縣公私從便主管並同見錢七百七十陌流轉行使, which essentially means that except in w:Sichuan, the bill may be used in the stead of 77,000 wen of metal coinage.

The Song Dynasty in China was the first to issue paper money, jiaozi, around the 10th century AD. Although the notes were valued at a certain exchange rate for gold, silver, or silk, conversion was never allowed in practice. The notes were initially to be redeemed after three years’ service, to be replaced by new notes for a 3% service charge, but, as more of them were printed without notes being retired, inflation became evident. The government made several attempts to support the paper by demanding taxes partly in currency and making other laws, but the damage had been done, and the notes fell out of favour 

The successive Yuan Dynasty was the first dynasty in China to use paper currency as the main circulating medium. The founder of the Yuan Dynasty, Kublai Khan, issued paper money known as Chao in his reign. The original notes during the Yuan Dynasty were restricted in area and duration as in the Song Dynasty.

During the 13th century, Marco Polo described the fiat money of the Yuan Dynasty in his book The Travels of Marco Polo.

The money supply of a country consists of currency (banknotes and coins) and usually includes bank money (the balance held in checking accounts and savings accounts). Bank money, which consists only of records (mostly computerized in modern banking), forms by far the largest part of broad money in developed countries.

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