Article: History of World War II: America’s Was Providing Military Aid to the USSR, While Also Supporting Nazi Germany

#AceHistoryNews -May.20: Great post from Global Research
History of World War II: America’s Was Providing Military Aid to the USSR, While Also Supporting Nazi Germany
http://www.globalresearch.ca/history-of-world-war-ii-americas-was-providing-military-aid-to-the-ussr-while-also-supporting-nazi-germany/5449378

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this day in crime history: may 20, 1899

Nobody Move!

slowdown

On this date in 1899, taxi driver Jacob German was arrested for speeding in New York City. German was operating his electric car at the breakneck pace of twelve miles per hour, four miles per hour over the speed limit. German is believed to be the first person cited for speeding in the United States.

Further reading:

The First Speeding Infraction in the U.S. was Committed by a New York City Taxi Driver in an Electric Car on May 20, 1899

US’ First-Ever Speeding Infraction Issued to Electric Vehicle in 1899

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SNIPPETS OF HISTORY: ‘ The Bread Winners of 1883 Anti-Labour Movement ‘

#AceHistoryNews – May.20: The Bread-Winners is an 1883 anti-labor novel by John Hay, who was Assistant Secretary to the President under Abraham Lincoln and McKinley’s final Secretary of State. Originally published anonymously in instalments in The Century Magazine, the book attracted wide interest and provoked considerable speculation over the author’s identity.

Hay wrote his only novel as a reaction to several strikes that affected him and his business interests in the 1870s and early 1880s. In the main storyline, a wealthy former army captain, Arthur Farnham, organizes Civil War veterans to keep the peace when the Bread-winners, a group of lazy and malcontented workers, call a violent general strike.

Hay had left hints as to his identity in the novel, and some guessed right, but he never acknowledged the book as his, and it did not appear with his name on it until after his death in 1905.

Hay’s hostile view of organized labor was soon seen as outdated, and the book is best remembered for its onetime popularity and controversial nature.


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