` Russia’s Crimea Celebrates 70 th Anniversary of Liberation from Nazi Invasion '

#AceHistory2Research – April 11 – CRIMEA – Three Crimean cities— Kerch, Dzhankoi and Krasnoperekopsk mark on Friday the 70th anniversary since the liberation from Nazi invaders in 1944.

It is symbolic that the date is marked shortly after the reunification with Russia, which Crimea also views as a great victory. For the first time, the date is marked on the peninsula under the Russian state three-colour flag.

Commemoration events began in the Hero City of Kerch on Thursday, when remains of 39 Soviet soldiers, found in search near the city in the autumn of 2013, were reburied at a military cemetery.

A ceremony will be held in the city on Friday to lay flowers at the Eternal Flame at Glory Square.
During World War II, Kerch was almost completely destroyed.

The title of Hero City was awarded to Kerch in 1973.

The Nazi occupation of Dzhankoi lasted 893 days. Thousands of Soviet war prisoners were killed in Nazi camps, and thousands more were shot dead on the northern outskirts of the city. Many Dzhankoi residents were driven to Germany for work.

Krasnoperekopsk was almost razed to the ground. Liberation Day is the second birthday for the city, Mayor Taras Filipchuk notes. A meeting on the central square, a concert and fireworks are planned in Krasnoperekopsk to mark the anniversary.

Kerch, Dzhankoi and Krasnoperekopsk were freed from the Nazi occupation at the beginning of the Soviet troops’ Crimean liberation operation that lasted from April 8 to May 12, 1944.

The Soviet troops liberated Armyansk on April 8, Simferopol, Feodosia and Yevpatoria on April 13, Sudak, Alushta and Bakhchisarai on April 14, Yalta on April 16 and so on. Memorial events will be held in all the cities.

Sevastopol will celebrate the liberation anniversary (May 9, 1944) together with Victory Day.

Russian History and Media News

#AH2RHN2014

#ah2rn2014, #crimea, #crimean, #dzhankoi, #germany, #kerch, #krasnoperekopsk, #nazi, #russia, #russian, #soviet-union, #world-war-ii

` World's Oldest Message in a Bottle Arrives Home after 101 Years to Sender '

#AceHistory2Research – BERLIN – April 09 – (DPA) – A message in a bottle tossed into the sea in Germany 101 years ago and believed to be the world’s oldest has been presented to the sender’s granddaughter, a museum said on Monday.

Holger von Neuhoff of the International Maritime Museum in Hamburg said: “This is certainly the first time such an old message in a bottle was found, particularly with the bottle intact.”

Researchers then set to work identifying the author and managed to track down his 62-year-old granddaughter Angela Erdmann, who lives in Berlin.

“It was almost unbelievable,” Erdmann told news agency DPA. She was first able to hold the brown bottle last week at the Hamburg museum.

Inside was a message on a postcard requesting the finder to return it to his home address in Berlin. “That was a pretty moving moment,” Erdmann said. “Tears rolled down my cheeks.”

Von Neuhoff said researchers were able to determine based on the address that it was 20-year-old baker’s son Richard Platz who threw the bottle in the Baltic while on a hike with a nature appreciation group in 1913.

A Berlin-based genealogical researcher then located Erdmann, who never knew Platz, her mother’s father who died in 1946 at the age of 54.

The Guinness World Records had previously identified the oldest message in a bottle as dating from 1914. It spent nearly 98 years at sea before being fished from the water.

Courtesy of: Ganhara – TLde – DPA with contributions from RFERL

#AH2RN2014

#baltic, #berlin, #hamburg-germany, #international-maritime-museum-in-hamburg

74 Years Ago Today: Booker T. Washington Becomes 1st African-American Honored on a U.S. Stamp

GOOD BLACK NEWS

Booker T. Washington stamp

The U.S. Postal Service regularly honors African-Americans on stamps in the present day, but Booker T. Washington was the first Black person to be honored in this way on April 7, 1940.

Washington was part of the U.S. Postal Service’s Famous Americans Series. The stamp was issued at a cost of 10 cents.

Washington was a prominent educator, having founded Alabama’s Tuskegee Normal Industrial School, which was renamed Tuskegee Institute in 1937. He was born enslaved on April 5, 1856, in Hale’s Ford, Virginia.  He died in Tuskegee, Alabama on Nov. 14, 1915.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt urged that Washington have his own stamp, after numerous petitions from African-American supporters. A ceremony was eventually held for the stamp’s revealing at the Tuskegee Institute.

article by Natelege Whaley via bet.com

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National Museum of African American History to Display Photos of the Gullah People

GOOD BLACK NEWS

daufuskie_missbertha.jpg.CROP.rtstoryvar-large Miss Bertha, 1977 (JEANNE MOUTOUSSAMY-ASHE/NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE)

The collection is haunting: black-and-white stills of another place from another time, a documentation of the Gullah, or Geechee, people—a population of African descendants living on the Sea Islands off the Eastern coastline.  The images of a place and a people that time forgot were captured by celebrated photographer Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe—the wife of renowned tennis player Arthur Ashe—between 1977 and 1981.

Bank of America donated the collection of more than 60 photos to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. The photographs center on the people and life of Daufuskie Island, a cultural and national treasure tucked away off the coast of South Carolina.

A “time capsule” is how the island was aptly described by Lonnie Bunch, the museum’s founding director, who is thrilled at the addition to the yet-to-be-finished museum…

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Made in China: an imperial Ming vase

British Museum blog

detail of Ming vaseYu-Ping Luk, Exhibition Project Curator, British Museum

Early last year, when the idea of a Spotlight tour to complement the BP exhibition Ming: 50 years that changed China was raised, we had to consider which single object from the British Museum collection could possibly represent early Ming dynasty (1368?1644) China. The answer seemed obvious – it had to be a spectacular blue-and-white porcelain vase.

Press launch in Room 33 of the Spotlight tour and Ming exhibitionPress launch in Room 33 of the Spotlight tour and Ming exhibition

Without knowing much about the Ming dynasty, most people will probably have heard of the ‘Ming vase’. The phrase ‘as precious as a Ming vase’ is often used to describe an antique object of great value. The plot device of a priceless Ming vase being smashed to pieces or stolen has been used in films and on television for comic or dramatic effect. The spotlight tour, together with the exhibition at the British Museum…

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The lives of others in runic inscriptions

British Museum blog

gold finger ring with runic inscriptionMartin Findell, Research Associate, University of Leicester

Gold finger-ring, engraved with a runic inscription. Late Anglo-Saxon, found in Cumbria, England. OA.10262 Gold finger-ring, engraved with a runic inscription. Late Anglo-Saxon, found in Cumbria, England. OA.10262

Call it perversity, but in my own research I’ve always had a taste for the unfashionable and the unglamorous areas of runic writing. I get more excited about a name scratched onto the back of a brooch than about a large and richly decorated runestone; and as a historical linguist, I take more pleasure in trying to work out problems of the relationship between spelling, speech and the changing structure of language than in broader questions of cultural history and society. Of course the two are interdependent, and while I concern myself with the troublesome nuts-and-bolts details of language, language is an aspect of culture and must be studied alongside other aspects of culture. Even the briefest and most unattractive inscription is an instance of language use by real…

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Did women in Greece and Rome speak?

#AH2RN2014 says ` Prof Mary Beard really interesting lady .

British Museum blog

Mary Beard, Professor of Classics, Cambridge University
Did women in Greece and Rome speak? Stupid question; of course they did. They must have chattered and joked together, laughed at the silliness of their menfolk, advised (or chatted up) their husbands, given lessons to their children… and much, much more.

But nowhere in the ancient world did they ever have a recognised voice in public – beyond, occasionally, complaining about the abuse they must often have suffered. Those who did speak out got ridiculed as being androgynes (‘men-women’). The basic motto (as for Victorian children) was that women should be seen and not heard, and best of all not seen either.

This streak of misogyny made a big impression on me when I first started learning ancient Greek about 45 years ago. One of the first things I read in Greek back then was part of Homer’s Odyssey – one of…

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` Republic of Crimea Threatens to Stop Cooperation with Europe if `Scythian Gold ' is not Returned to Crimean Museum '

#AceHistory2Research – PETERSBURG – April 07 – Russian scholars from the State Hermitage Museum have concluded that a discovery of Scythian gold in a Siberian grave last summer is the earliest of its kind ever found and that it pre-dates Greek influence.

The find is leading to a change in how scholars view the supposed barbaric, nomadic tribes that once roamed the Eurasian steppes.

The dig near Kyzyl, the capital of the Siberian republic of Tuva, revealed almost 5,000 decorative gold pieces — earrings, pendants and beads — that adorned the bodies of a Scythian man and woman, presumably royalty, and dated from the fifth or sixth centuries B.C. In addition to the gold, which weighed almost 44 pounds, the archaeologists discovered items made of iron, turquoise, amber and wood.

“There are many great works of art — figures of animals, necklaces, pins with animals carved into a golden surface,” said Dr. Mikhail Piotrovsky, director of the Hermitage Museum. “It is an encyclopedia of Scythian animal art because you have all the animals which roamed the region, such as panther, lions, camels, deer, etc. This is the original Scythian style, from the Altai region, which eventually came to the Black Sea region and finally in contact with ancient Greece, and it resembles almost an Art Nouveau style.”

Russian and German archaeologists excavated a Scythian burial mound on a grassy plain that locals have long called the Valley of the Kings because of the large number of burial mounds of Scythian and other ancient nomadic royalty.

The fierce nomadic Scythian tribes roamed the Eurasian steppe, from the northern borders of China to the Black Sea region, in the seventh to third centuries B.C. In the fifth and fourth centuries B.C. they interacted with the ancient Greeks who had colonized the Black Sea region, which is now in Ukraine and southern Russia.

Not surprisingly ancient Greek influence was evident in Scythian gold previously discovered, but the recent find dates from before contact with the Greeks and from the heart of Siberia where, scholars say, contact with outsiders can almost be excluded.

After its discovery, the treasure was sent to the Hermitage Museum for storage and restoration, and it will stay there until Tuva can build a museum to house the items. This is in accordance with Russian Federation law stating that items be displayed in their place of discovery so long as local authorities provide the proper conditions.

Building such a museum is years away, however, Dr. Piotrovksy said. Until then they will remain in the Hermitage, and at some point will be put on display.

Future Intentions:

Recently arguments are in existence over who should be looking after the gold and “If the collection does not return to its legal owners in the near future, the question of taking any items of cultural value out of Crimea to European countries will be removed from the agenda,” Kosarev said to (Tass).

Scythian gold collection should be returned to Crimea – Russian State Duma speaker
“We are going to regard it as an absolutely disgraceful attitude on the part of Europeans to the idea of museum cooperation,” Kosarev added.

The Scythian gold was taken out of Crimean museums for an exhibition in the Netherlands. “It belongs to Crimea and not Ukraine,” Kosarev emphasized.

“The Scythian golden items and other historical artifacts were found in the territory of our republic. They were described, stored and exhibited in our museums,” Kosarev said, wondering who else could claim the right to the Scythian gold if the collection had been collected in the Republic of Crimea and had left abroad from the Crimean territory.

If the collection does not return to Crimea, the republic will challenge this decision to the very “end”, Kosarev stressed.

According to him, Europe will lose a lot if it hands over the collection to Kiev.

#AH2RN2014

#black-sea, #crimea, #eurasian, #europe, #greek, #kiev, #netherlands, #republic-of-crimea, #scythian-gold, #siberian, #state-duma, #ukrainian

Humans and saber-toothed tiger met in Germany 300,000 years ago

#AceHistory2ResearchNews says a nice bit of research Shaun #shaunynews

` On the 65th Anniversary of `NATO ' Debate over the Organisations Expansion remains Contentious '

#AceHistory2Research – NATO – April 04 – On the 65th anniversary of NATO, the debate over the organization’s expansion remains highly contentious, with some viewing it as a broken promise to Russia after the fall of the Iron Curtain.

NATO, an intergovernmental military alliance based on the North Atlantic Treaty, was signed on April 4, 1949 when the US, Canada, Portugal, Italy, Norway, Denmark, and Iceland joined the members of the Treaty of Brussels to form the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

The idea of the alliance was to provide defence against a prospective Soviet invasion. In the early 1950’s, the focus of the communism vs. capitalism fight shifted to Asia, where a series of bloody proxy wars played a major role in convincing Europeans that the Soviet Union and its allies were extremely dangerous and had to be contained at all costs.

Since the reunification of Germany, NATO has almost doubled in size – from 16 member states in 1990 to 28 currently.

Most senior Russian officials feel tricked by NATO and accuse the West of not following through with its commitments made during German reunification negotiations, when NATO agreed not to expand to the East.

Mikhail Gorbachev, the Soviet president at the time, confirmed that there was a promise not to enlarge NATO, not even “as much as a thumb’s width further to the East.” But this commitment was never formally documented, and since then the alliance has grown drastically.

#AH2RN2014

#brussels, #canada, #denmark, #european, #germany, #iceland, #iron-curtain, #italy, #nato, #north-atlantic-treaty, #norway, #portugal, #russia, #russian, #soviet-union, #us